Continuation of Page ZERO               

 

 

Once upon a time I was young and carefree and had lots of hair upon my head. That is no longer how my life is. I am now old and bald and more disciplined than I care to be. 

I too often remember the days when: Nam was the big topic and the men and women over there were in the tropics. Where heat and bugs and death were taking a toll on America's best. When Purple Hearts were just part of the job, and goodies from home were welcomed by all. Where the enemy was everywhere and no where. Where boredom was interrupted by 7.62 and R.P.Gs. and maybe a reckless rifle or two.

What to do when civilians bring a woman whose right hand they give to you and say fix it please....When a young girl is brought out that has a fluted anchor embedded in her birth canal after being assaulted by the ones trying to kill you. A cry for help is sent out, only to be followed by a voice that says, "proper radio procedure, please". Sometimes the insanity of Nam was what kept US from doing a proper Job. 

Long, hot, and sometimes rainy days were followed by dark, moonless nights that slowly pasted with the sounds a jungle made. Your best friend often made comments on how "short" he was, but he arrived home with an escort from above to lie in a grave in a garden of stones now visited, I hope, by the ones he once loved. Many friendships have endured for these many years, but deaths have decreased the number that once was shared.

  I have no fear from what awaits me, it is my and all's destiny. Until then, Life is just another day in Paradise, U. S. A. 

Paul Wayne Cagle (Praise the Lord, and pass the ammo.) 
American by birth 
Vietnam Veteran by choice

                          all about  STABs & PBR Boats! (watch this flick!)

 

x

 

 

From: Joseph Vitale 
To: Paul Cagle ; JERRY G ; Gary Marker ; Wes W ; Bill Akin ; Douglas Fletcher ; Fries ; DICK GODBEHERE ; AL OCANAS; Jim Thompson 
Sent Date: Sat, Dec 21, 2013
Subject: Re: New Army Rifle - No joke
THIS MUST MEAN THE MARINES WILL GET ALL THE BALL AND CAP RIFLES !
from mike saint to me.

HAVE A GREAT CUP OF COFFEE OR WHATEVER YOUR DRINK IS ON SUNDAY MORNING.

 CRAZY JOE

Date: Sun, 22 Dec 2013
From: wakin63
Subject: Re: Fwd: New Army Rifle - No joke
To: hflht1997; namdevil; jerry.gandy; markergw; wessally; dfletcheramm; rhfries; dickgodbehere; aocanas1; sonofaxx

W T F, over? *:-/ confused 


From: Jim Thompson>
To: Bill Akin ; joe vitale ; Paul Cagle ; JERRY G ; Gary Marker ; Wes W ; Douglas Fletcher ; Fries ; DICK GODBEHERE; AL OCANAS
Sent: Sunday, December 22, 2013
I was in country when we got the first issue of the M-16. The Marine brass held off accepting the M-16. I respected that given all the problems we had with the new M-16 and 5.56 rounds. 

Superman and Winter GA ME 2000 

From: Paul Wayne Cagle
To: Ralph Fries
Sent: Sunday, December 22,
Subject: Re: New Army Rifle - No joke 

Do you remember what the washing solution was called? 

On Sun, Dec 22, 2013 wrote: 

We had a few problems with the M-16 in River Section-535. The biggest problem was keeping them clean from the rust that would form on them from the moisture of that miserable weather in the Delta. Most of the problems went away after I built wash tanks with gun cleaning solution so you could put the entire weapon (.50's, shotgun, M-16, .38 pistol, M-79) into to soak before you removed them to disassemble and clean each part thoroughly before re-assemble. All my guys had their own timing tools I provided them so they could make each weapon work efficiently for them when they had to fire them in a firefight. 


On Sun, Dec 22, 2013
  <rhfries> wrote: 

Good Afternoon Paul, 

No I don't remember the name of gun cleaning solution we used. I got in 5 gals cans from the Army. It worked for us and my guys used our method of keeping all our weapons in good working order. The boat crews clean all their weapons everyday after each patrol, regardless whether they were fired them or not. My guys wanted to survive and not have their weapons jam up during a firefight, cleanness was the key and free from the rust. 

I met every patrol, whether going on or off and talked all of them every day. They sometimes called me the preacher. 

B/R Bro,  Ralph

Ralph J. Fries River Section-535 Logistic/Maintenance Officer 9/67 to 5/68


From: Paul Wayne Cagle 
to: Ralph, bcc: Rio
Subject:  New Army Rifle - No joke 

Acetone, which is dry cleaning solvent was what we had at My Tho. My nickname is Ice Man to some and it is because I shot the ice machine with the aft 50 caliber of PBR 139 at the base in My Tho. True story. A few others called me Magnet, but I never really understood why. I guess you would have hung me from the nearest Palm Tree. To this day, no one really knows the Truth why I shot the Ice Machine......and the rest is history from the Land of Paradise---Vietnam, Republic of. 


From:Paul Wayne Cagle 
to:     Bill, Joseph, aaron 091563,
bcc:   me
On a boat in the land of Paradise just floating lazily down a Brown Water River headed to the South China Sea. There is a Truce and we cannot shoot back you see. A few tracers pierce the midnight sky letting us all know that people will still die. How many Christmas' have I been from home? Oh yeah, 3 counting the Destroyer I was on in 66. Politics and war do not mix but here we float down a Brown Water River trying to be polite to all for it is Christmas in the land controlled by Politicians in another land where Santa will sing out his familiar sound...Ho Ho Ho. I can not complain because I volunteered to be here again. But I know that this is not a Game and soon old man "War" will strike and make a claim. The night is very dark but so peaceful at times that it makes one wonder if we all have gone insane. Years from now will people back home ever care or is this just another year in The Land of Paradise, Vietnam, Republic of. P W Cagle, GMG3 PBRs 124 &139 (most of the time) Riv/Sec 532 
8/67 to 4/69 U S Navy 

Merry Christmas to all, especially to those who remember those Decembers.



On Wed, Dec 25, 2013 
Ron Laratta  wrote: 


Boydstun, Love, me and a couple of others "skarffed" a PBR and drove over to Dong Tam to see Bob Hope in '68... I picked up a couple of .50 gun barrels from Weaps. I think I traded a shit load of .22 cal ammo that was floating around. Gunner's Mates are ALWAYS looking for a "deal" wherever and whenever. Anyway, Dong Tam is why I hate to hear "Silent Night" anymore. Hope commented about a firefight y'all engaged across the My Tho or Ham Loung rivers - at Ben tre, I think.... He said, "I hope that's our side!" Everyone kinda answered at the same time - "Not really, dude!" Anyway - Merry -freaking- Christmas, man. 

Best Regards, Ron For the "Bad Guys" - life is good . . . UNTIL ---- NAVY Special Warfare shows up! 
Check Out Our World Travels on our Website. 
Click on: www.2koolkruisers.wordpress.com/


FrinL Paul Wayne Cagle 
to:     Ron, Jim, Art,
bcc: me 

Stef had put some of us in a guard post position near the entrance to Dong Tam and we had someone or something come too close to the site and we opened up on whatever it was.. Stef told us to blast anything that came near Dong Tam... We could hear the music and it just made matters worse because we were feeling down because of the so called truce and it was Christmas. Frigging Truce was a joke. Wacasey and me were ashore with a M-60 and had a M-79 and M-14 sniper rifle. I think we wasted a Big Foot that night......

 

     Mi Vida Loca - Copyright ©1998 - All Right Reserved        email:   el_ticitl @yahoo.com

 

              
                                                     Jessica and Angel Medina,  May she Rest in Peace in Heaven

 


John Kerry, Probably the foremost Vietnam War Protestor and also SELF MADE Swift Boat Hero.  He wrote himself up for a Silver Star and also two "Band Aid" Purple Hearts.  He is despised by all USNavy Brown Water Boat Sailors.  ALso wannabe President of the USA, and now, 2013, ZEROBama's puppet.

 

x

 

 

 

 


David Clouse

 

 
Glen Slay

 


Glen Grinnage in Miabashi Japan, He was the coxswain for our STAB boat in 1967 ST-2 MyTho 'nam.   He is single in Japan, but i reckon not for long.

 

                  The Mysterious "Third" STAB? 

        MUST be read from the bottom upwards.  thank You.  Doc RIOja

         
This STAB is the real Origional Deal

Robert Stoner 

to John, me, Norm, Bill, James, John, Hawkins 


Correct, Norm. The second STAB was the STrike Assault Boat and was

 the brainchild of ComNavForV, ADM Zumwalt. He envisioned a small, highly maneuverable and well armed boat that could be inserted and extracted into the enemy's back yard to raise Hell and then leave. The boat selected was the LSSC (modified). This new boat, STAB, was two feet longer and changed its main propulsion to two Chevy 427 cu. in. gas engines with MerCruiser stern drives. A flotation box plus guards for the stern drives were added to the transom and increased the overall length of the boat from 24 feet (LSSC) to 26 feet (STAB). When StabRon 20 reached Vietnam in the early months of 1970, ADM Zumwalt had moved up to Chief of Naval Operations. Folks really didn't know what to do with the unit so Ron 20 was assigned to RivPatFlot V as part of Operation GAME WARDEN. 

StabRon 20 was assigned to the upper Mekong River near the Cambodian border and operated from the USS BENEWAH (APB-35). The boats were assigned the 40 mile long Grand Canal as their patrol area. When the invasion of Cambodia was mounted by U.S. and VN forces, LCDR Kirk Ferguson and 10 boats went into Cambodia with the other riverine forces. after the Cambodian operation was over, StabRon 20 was broken into two divisions of 10 boats; one was assigned to Dong Tam and the other to Nha Be until they were ordered to stand down in October 1970. 

StabRon 20 was not part of NavSpecWarGrp, but they did transport SEALs from time to time. StabRon 20 was deactivated in-country and returned to ConUS in November 1970. Its boats were sold to private parties, scrapped, or expended as targets. 

Below: Tired STABs of StabRon 20 are readied for return to ConUS in November 1970. 




----- Original Message ----- 


From: Norm Olson 

To: Robert Stoner ; John Woody ; Erasmo "Doc" Riojas 

Cc: Bill Moreo ; James and Cheryl GRAY ; John Rapp ; Hawkins - VB Tom 

Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 2:37 PM 

Subject: Re: The Mysterious "Third" STAB? 






I don’t want to perpetuate this discussion further, but it’s not too far fetched to believe that a similar hull was commandeered by the boat thieves and modified in country to resemble a STAB. I’m also out of my realm in mentioning this, but separately there was STABRON 20 that had a family of Strike Assault Boats designed for the purpose of inserting, supporting, and extracting small units. They brought the first Mark II STABs in country, but I have no idea when and where, and I doubt they supported SEALs. Also the boats don’t resemble the STABs that were designed and built by Jack Macione at SEAL Team TWO. 


From: Robert Stoner 

Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 1:20 PM 

To: John Woody ; Erasmo "Doc" Riojas ; Norm Olson 

Cc: Bill Moreo ; James and Cheryl GRAY ; John Rapp ; Hawkins - VB Tom 

Subject: Re: The Mysterious "Third" STAB? 

That's what I'd thought also. But, what's very strange is there appears to be this [call it STAB III] configuration. The "third" STAB belonged to LT Bob Dussault (deceased 2005) at Nha Be. It was also used by the MST at Long Phu [Bill Strawbridge photo of LCPL towing the STAB]. This is very puzzling. John Woody, who was the third MST OIC at Binh Thuy, remembers three STABS at Binh Thuy, Can Tho, and Nha Be. I wonder where this odd ball boat came from? 

Below: The LCPL of the MST det at Long Phu tows its STAB. 

----- Original Message ----- 

From: Norm Olson 

To: Robert Stoner ; John Woody ; Erasmo "Doc" Riojas 

Cc: Bill Moreo ; James and Cheryl GRAY ; John Rapp ; Hawkins - VB Tom 

Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 11:50 AM 

Subject: Re: The Mysterious "Third" STAB? 

Bob, 

As far as I know, the 3rd STAB crashed and burned in LC when the rigging on the helicopter let loose. You previously asked if I had any files on past dialog concerning STABs. Attached is everything that I retained. 

Norm 


From: Robert Stoner 

Sent: Friday, August 02, 2013 1:40 AM 

To: John Woody ; Erasmo "Doc" Riojas 

Cc: Bill Moreo ; James and Cheryl GRAY ; Norm Olson ; John Rapp 

Subject: The Mysterious "Third" STAB? 


While looking through the BSU-1 pages at Doc Rio's website, I found a mysterious photo of the "third" STAB. It is different in layout than STAB I and STAB II. Do any of you know anything about this STAB and where it operated from? Supposedly, STAB III had a centerline fuel cell. 


Below: STABs I & II running together. 

Above: Topside configuration of STABs II & II. 

Below: Topside configuration of STAB III. Note how the coxswain's position has been moved forward.

 

Both STAB configurations did operate together from Binh Thuy in 1968 Tet. 



Above: This is the original STAB as built by ST-2 at LCrk. 

Below: The same boat (STAB 1) after hard service (about 1968). Note position of helm and straight dash. 




Above: Both original STAB and modified STAB before an op from Binh Thuy. Not the rear location of helmsman and straight dash of the nearest boat as compared to the forward mounted helmsman position of the rear boat. (Steering wheel just below the arm of the sailor bending over.) 

Below: The modified STAB had a redesigned helm (moved forward) and a centerline fuel cell. Note the "strakes" on either side of the helmsman that immediately identify this boat. 





Above: Overhead view of the second version STAB showing the modified or forward helm position and strakes on either side. The centerline fuel cell (tan box) is obvious in this photo.


This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

Glen Grinnage BSU-1 'nam

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 16, 2013 
from: kkalish763  [at] comcast  DOT net
to:  Doc Riojas at www SEALTWO org

Doc, 
Thanks for your note,
Joe is an associate member, so I don’t think he could be my sponsor. He is a retired JOCM who served with me at AFVN in Saigon. I saw My Tho mentioned. Our patrol area was roughly from Rach Gia to just above Vinh Long, so we didn’t get over there much – in part because of Caldwell’s corners. Passed by there once when we transited the Mo Cay canal in force, all of our 523 boats and a STAB.
One of our SEALs was pretty badly burned during that trip. He and two or three others had gone after a VC in the woods with a machine gun, but when they went into a hooch to see if that guy was alone they hit a trip wire that set off a gasoline bomb. They had set another one we didn’t fall for, a VC flag on a small mud “island” in the middle of the canal.


A couple of the newer PBR guys wanted to get the flag, but Lt. Calvert explained rather abruptly that they’d probably want to go home with the family jewels intact more than they wanted a VC flag.GMG2 Barlow was my boat captain on 136 (a Mk 1 PBR) and I was usually forward gunner. I was national President of Gamewardens of Viet Nam from 1997 to 1999. You take care.


I’ll get a donation off to you later in the week. I’m down in Minneapolis right now for some VA stuff, but I will be back to the farm by Wednesday.
You wouldn’t want to buy a llama, would you? I rescue them now, but I may have to give that up if they make me go to a permanent cath.


Ken Kalish

 

                                               
                                           Davis helped the 7th SEAL Plt.; ST-2;  in 'nam as an interpreter.

 

            Eternal Salvation and Survival 


by    Billy Hoffmann 
January 23, 2013

“Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money; come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price. Wherefore do ye spend money for that which is not bread? and your labor for that which satisfieth not? hearken diligently unto Me, and eat ye that which is good, and let your soul delight in fatness. Incline your ear, and come unto Me: hear, and your soul shall live; and I will make an everlasting covenant with you” -Isaiah 55:1-3 [KJV] 

Without doubt we all know that these are turbulent, tumultuous times with violence, treachery and all manner of evil that is growing exponentially. Reading The Survivalist Blog has been helpful to me and my family with all the informative reports, reviews and articles regarding the many facets of survival and prudent preparations, some of which I enjoy passing along to my family, friends and neighbors. 

As a follower of the Lord Jesus Christ and as a patriotic American and former military man, by the grace of God, I see life and that which is transpiring before us today through a biblical world-view. There’s no need for me to convince you readers of this outstanding web-log that it is a good thing to set aside, to stock-up and to prepare for hardships or for “rainy days”. As history records it is a good thing to remember how men of God of long ago such as Noah, who was a “preacher of righteousness” (II Peter 2:5), obeyed God’s warning and prepared for the flood. So too did Joseph, who was warned of God to prepare for seven years of famine while he was Pharaoh’s second-in-command in Egypt. It is written for our admonition, “But if any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel” (I Timothy 5:8). 

While we would agree that temporal preparations are a good thing for this life time it is my prayer that you’ll seriously think upon matters regarding eternity. Our physical life upon this earth is so brief. My grandmother, who I named Mimi when I was a little boy back in the early ’60's, passed away recently at the ripe old age of 103 years old. Though she lived so long a time on this earth it’s not even a ‘drop in the bucket’ compared to eternity. The holy scripture says, “For all flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away: but the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you” (I Peter 1:24-25). 

I submit to you the following holy scriptures and short commentary for your prayerful and serious consideration. 

“It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man. It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in princes.” -Psalm 118:8-9 [KJV] “Salvation is of the LORD.” -Jonah 2:9c [KJV] 

“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth My word, and believeth on Him that sent Me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.” -John 5:24 [KJV] 

Dear neighbors, the “Good News” gospel message that is here proclaimed unto you is that Jesus Christ the LORD was sent by the Father to effectually & fully SAVE poor, needy, wretched sinners by His own sovereign FREE grace and by His perfect righteousness charged to our accounts! 

Regarding this “so great salvation” by Jesus Christ alone please consider the following words of wisdom, 

“Salvation is of the LORD” (Jonah 2:9c), entirely so, from beginning to end. It is God’s “great salvation,” in its origination, in its effectuation, in its application and in its consummation. Man contributes nothing to it whatsoever. All the Trinity are concerned and engaged in it. The Father is the Author of salvation from sin, Christ the Purchaser, the Spirit the Conveyor. It is the Father who begets the elect (James 1:17, 18); yet they are declared to be the “seed” of Christ (Is. 53:10), while they are “born” of the Spirit (Jn. 3:6).” -The Satisfaction of Christ, ch. xii, by Arthur W. Pink 

“The gospel is no other than a pure promise, a free declaration of peace and pardon, righteousness, life, and salvation to poor sinners by Jesus Christ. The sum and substance of it is, that “This is a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Tim. 1:15). -The Doctrine of Imputed Righteousness Without Works, by John Gill 

“Christ died for the UNGODLY” (Rom. 5:6). God’s righteous grace comes to us through the law-honoring, justice-satisfying, sin-atoning Work of the Lord Jesus! Here, then, is the very essence of the Gospel: the proclamation of God’s amazing grace, the declaration of Divine bounty, altogether irrespective of human worth or merit. In the great Satisfaction of His Son, God has “brought near HIS righteousness” (Isa. 46:13). -The Doctrine of Justification, ch. vii, by Arthur W. Pink 

“The miracle announced by the Gospel is that God comes to the ungodly with a mercy that is righteous, and in spite of all their depravity and rebellion, enables them through faith (on the ground of Christ’s righteousness) to enter into a new and blessed relation with Himself.” -ibid. 

Friends, I tell you that Almighty God has, by Himself, worked-out and provided a perfect salvation for all those who do hunger and thirst for His righteousness. Salvation is NOT by what “church” we attend; it is not by what “good deeds” we do, nor is it by our tradition/s, our tithing, almsgiving, religious observances: it is solely by the finished work of Christ Jesus the Lord, Who is coming back one day as the mighty and conquering King of glory.

http://www.thesurvivalistblog. net/eternal-salvation-and- survival/

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

               

 

 

Billy Hoffmann   - SBU-13    History

< align="center">

 Ref:  http://www.warboats.org/SBU13Hoffmann.htm     forShipmate (alumni) names and historical tidbits: jamesthomas@warboats.org

LCPLs amongst PBs and PTFs and ASDV at Coronado NAB
 

UDT swimmers on Paradrop

An SBU-13 PL heads out to support combat swimmers with Point Loma in Background.
 

A jumper lands between zodiac 

Good evening, Jim ~ 

I was at SBU-13 from 1981 to 1983 and I learned (OJT) on one of our green LCPL's and after a break-in period became coxswain of my own boat. I just loved it. As you well remember, sometimes we provided boat support to the UDT teams (SDV and otherwise), occasionally SEAL Team 1, Force RECON and even had the chance to work with some Army Rangers once as they were conducting Helo water insertions and recovery training. 

Considering that SBU-13 was my third command, it wasn't until I got assigned there that I really started to enjoy and take pride in the Navy. Back in '81 through '83 SBU-13 was a Reserve unit and we did not deploy like the SBU -12 guys. It was with some envy that the fellers' in unit -12 would tell me of their deployments to the P.I.. 

When I first checked aboard as a seaman, the two PTF boats were still alongside the pier. Fascinating boats... kind of sad that they were left in such disrepair. I'll bet they were remarkable in their day. 

I spent the first year and half (approx.) being a coxswain on one of the LCPL's, this prior to the SeaFox. Unit -12 was the first to get them and eventually we (SBU-13) got a couple. You may remember that one fellow named Mike Douglas. He had been in law enforcement for ages and came back into the Navy as a BM1, this to finish up his last five years or so and retire. For a short period we did some OPS together on one of the Seafox's. One time we did a public relation event and took the Seafox and a PB up to Santa Barbara and gave tours & rides to the public. That was the place for liberty. I can't say I was all that impressed with those Seafoxes. 

I remember SBU-13 training with SBU #11.The PB guys drove up the coast but I think the bulk of us were driven up to Vallejo in a bus. I really enjoyed working with the River Boatguys up there and was extremely impressed with their P-Bar's, ATC's and such. They had Swift boats back then but I personally didn't get a chance to train on them. We stayed in their shoddy barracks. One of the SEAL's assigned to SBU-11 was a crusty old Vietnam veteran, a Senior Chief with glasses, Wade Puckett, and he was an outstanding instructor. I paid close attention to his teachings about water-borne guard post, riverine operations, boat/personnel searches, etc. That trip was quite beneficial in my book. I think it was a real eye-opener to us from SBU-13 as we were a Coastal and and Seal Support Unit. 

SBU-13 did have a form of S.O.C. crews. There was talk of attending Army jump-school at Ft. Benning, but that didn't materialize when I was there. Some of us got some extra training: SERE School at FASOTRAGRUPAC (the nine day C.O.I.) and later a three-day "advanced" SERE seminar, both of which were outstanding. I attended the Assault Boat Coxswain School there at NAB and had a great time learning how to drive the Higgin's Boat, Mike 6 and 8 boats. We even attended a one-week long sailing school in San Diego. The objective was to prepare and be ready to insert/extract a SPECOP's team via "indigenous" craft. After that fun training, I never stepped aboard another sailboat while at SBU... Go figure. I personally felt we didn't shoot enough but then the PL's did not carry crew served weapons. Compared to the Modern SWCC of today it was a veritable "McHale's Navy" back then. 

Though the training I received was somewhat limited, I took the job at-hand very seriously and did my level best. Had a blast working with the frogmen and whether it was a "tactical" night-ops or be it a day-time "Dive Requal", I took pride in doing the best I could for the guys. 

Back then, in our little Quonset hut near the watch-tower, we had a Boatswain's Mate 1st Class who was our supervisor. He was a Mexican/American fellow who was a highly knowledgeable fleet-sailor. He was a great guy and taught me some good stuff as I studied for BM 3rd Class. 

Toward the end of my tour there, I was assigned to one of the PB's. There was a BM1 who had a beard; he was a real squared-away sailor and he was the OIC of that particular PB. Later on a black fella', also a BM1, took over the boat. We did a few trips out to San Clemente Island for a week at-a-time. 

The last year-and-a-half I spent at SBU-13, I applied myself in getting ready for BUD/S. CDR Richards approved my request to take the screening test and Dive Physical. However, prior to all that I had met a frog named John Prior, a PO1 in one of the Units there at NAB. When I met John, he was working with the dolphins (you know the deal on all that...). He took me under his wing and helped me get ready. We spent over a year running, swimming, doing obstacle courses, etc., etc. In addition to all that, because I wasn't a high school graduate, I attended evening classes at the Coronado High School (adult education), this to help me with mathematics. Without the latter I would never have been able to pass muster in Dive Physics and of course, demolitions. I can say with confidence that being assigned to Special Boat Unit-13 was overall an great experience; it also served as a spring-board to becoming a frogman. You and I have a unique and special background Jim. Think about what John Paul Jones said, "Give me a fast boat for I intend to go into harms way." 

After graduating from BUD/S Class #126 in the spring of '84, I was assigned to SEAL Team 2 for four years. In the fall of '87 I tried out for SEAL VI --- that is Team 6. Was there from Dec. of '87 until my medical discharge in Nov. of '96 when I had to leave the service after only eighteen years. To say the least, I had quite an exciting time at those units and worked with some of the most hard-core fellers' imaginable. 

I never worked with the boys in SBU-26 but I did participate in Operation Just Cause down in Panama. We lost about twenty-four (24) special operators down there. Four brave men from SEAL Team 4 were whacked while conducting an operation at Patilla Airfield during "H-Hour". You may recall hearing that two platoons were sent there to disable Gen. Noriega's private aircraft. The real pisser in all of this is that these men were highly constrained by asinine Rules of Engagement (ROE) --- that is, they were forbidden to shoot first! The other twenty-some guys that died down there were men from Task Force 160th Special Operations Air Regiment (SOAR), Army Rangers and I think one man from Delta SFOD may have been killed. It really sucked having to attend memorial services in the midst of it all, too. 

It was quite unique in that "we" (Joint Special Operations, in general) locked-down the entire country in a very short period of time. It was a spectacular operation. I do recall there was a Special Boat Unit down there too, but I didn't know any of the guys there. They did provide one of our Assault Teams (RED) with boat support during a ship-board search of some freighter. One of my old Team-mates named Randy B. and his dive-buddy were the boys who planted explosives on one of the Panamanian patrol boats. I think he was assigned to SEAL 2 during that mission. They blew that boat just as "H-Hour" went down and apparently that thing actually lifted out of the water when the charge went off... BAM! But enough Sea Stories. 

Regarding some separate issues, Jim: thanks for adding my name and contact info to the alumni list. I ain't no pastor or theologian, but I do love the Lord Jesus and my neighbor as myself. I have a big heart for veterans, especially the men in Special Warfare - whether they be special boat operators, admin/support staff or frogmen. You'll have to pardon my enthusiasm. If I can ever be of any assistance to you or the alumni (active, disabled veterans or retired) then it would be an honor. Be advised that due to financial limitations & medical considerations that traveling is difficult. 


              With care, Billy Hoffmann     

 email: JesusChristKING [at]  centurytel  DOT   net

 

 

Robert Stoner

G'day, Doc.
 
I was on your site today in the boat guys section and remembered I had another installment of Ordnance Notes to finish on the HK rifles ST used in RVN.  I gave you photo credit for the pic of Al Ashton covering the VC with his HK33.
 
I've got a G3 and a CETME clone (7.62 NATO calibers) with the HK-type roller locked breech.  It works OK, but I've always thought it was the strangest operating system I've seen in a small arm.
 
If you run across any changes for my Ordnance Notes piece, let me know.
 
Bob
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 07, 2013 12:33 AM
Subject: Ordnance Notes -- Heckler and Kock HK33 Rifle

Hi Dan,
 
I found another small arm to add to Ordnance Notes -- the Heckler and Koch HK33 rifle.  The HK33 was a ST-2 peculiar personal weapon and MST did not use them.  The HK33 was used by riflemen in the SEAL squad.
 
Bob

 

 


 

 From: Minh Nguyenhoangminh <nguyenhoangminh1939@yahoo.com.vn> Date: Fri, Jun 7, 2013 at 6:12 AM Subject: Re: V?: Fwd: FW: Viet Nam To: Erasmo Doc Riojas <docrio45@gmail.com> Cc: nguyenhoangminh939@yahoo.com 

Dear Doc, l got U.S.D 400 on June 7-2013 you gave to me, thank you very much. 

Dear Doc, yesterday, June 6-2013 l sent e-mail to Mr. Kraft l don't know, did he get it yet? you don't worry about many time, you told me, l must sent mail to him. l did l wrote a letter to him for a long time, but he didn't write back to me l told him, thank him very much for money and packages he sent to me. l remember, the first time he sent one CD to me l like it very much, because there were many v.c collect war booty and many v.c was killed by seals. l have read a book " good to go " there was battlefield at CHO THOM, MO CAY, BEN TRE. There were sixty v.c and many prisoners was captured by U.S seals. How beautiful battlefields is. 

Doc, you know, when we fly by a helicopter at CHO THOM market we saw big v.c flag made by Tole and Hang it before the door market and we turn back to MO CAY district Chief and l asked him. How long division 7 operation this area? he said that about 2 years ago. But division 7 was wipe out about 250 soldiers and district Chief asked me, how many division will go operation here? I'm smiling I'm thinking by myself l said about two divisions. He is very happy when l said that because he didn't know we are seals that day we got operation there only twenty seals. 

after operation there, there was sixty v.c and many prisoners was captured by seals, after we took them to MO CAY district Chief and who asked me how many soldiers for this operation l told him twenty seal only, but there 10 seals at VINH LONG and 10 seals at MY THO. 

Doc, you we were there before right? the bravest how beautiful operation is. 
Thank you very much for money you gave to me. 

Best regards 

MINH


Brian W Curle
 
  Hey Doc ,  Good Morning ,  Yes you have the photo on your website.. It
comes after the longest story on your site about 2/3 down the scroll ..
It is on the scroll close to  the wet suit shot of me that takes one to
my website..                          It is the ST-2 site

        Subject: SEAL Team 8 , INDIA Platoon Photo

     The photo is   SEAL Team 8 , India Platoon just before it was
deployed to Iraq .  Also pictured with India Platoon is Film Producer
S.L. Crawford (who made 11 films about Navy SEALs ), and LT. Mike
Phillips ( a veteran of  the   SEAL Team 4  attack on General Noriega's
airport . His  operation came under extremely heavy fire ,but Phillip's
and his platoon successfully  blocked the Generals  escape from PANAMA
)..  I'm the guy with the camera - Brian Curle .. UDT-12 , UDT-13 , SEAL
Team 1 .. 2 Viet Nam Tours and an Apollo Recovery . .. .Proud to be a
member of  our Brother hood ..

 

 

 

 

 
Bob Gibson's Photos & SeaStories

From:Bob Gibson <rungsat  [at]  msn  DOT  com> 
10Feb2013 
to:  Doc Riojas, JOJO, me, Jim 


In 1996 I led a Group that was to do a Documentary and I was going to search for MIA's etc.... "Jimbo" Watson and "Dickie" Marcinko - I paid $13,000 for their air fare, etc..., were also on the trip. Due to Watson having taken hundreds of Photos from the Museum (which showed SEALs killing, etc..., many Viet Cong) and laying them out on his bed in the New World Saigon Hotel for the Viet Cong to see, and Marcinko throwing a Beer Drinking, Log Burning, Film Making episode in the City Park across the street from the New World Saigon Hotel, things became difficult. 

You should see the Videos (Marcinko said he would sue anyone who ever showed anything) of the Viet Cong coming to the park and the dozens of "red dots" on Marcinko's chest - it was a miracle they did not kill him in 1996. Watson & Marcinko also went to towns they were not supposted to visit and on and on. They cost me $13,000 as I paid for their air fare, etc... 

One of the people the Viet Cong had agreed to talk about was Nguyen Hoang Minh, however, the 2 SEALs I mentioned really screwed things up. The Viet Cong talked about him for approximately 10 minutes one day. 

However, due to the behavior of Watson & Marcino, the Viet Cong retained me on 2 different days. 

JOJO TRAN led us and he did a great job. After we returned to the United States, JOJO "escaped." I went to New Orleans and testified for him. A few years later, I testified at his hearing in Seattle, Washington. 

And yes, I am a member of the Association - and Yes, I have Video's, Films, Photos, etc.... to prove exactly what I am saying. 

Bob

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

Minh and Family  Bob Gibson's Photos and Stories

 

 

 

Subject:  [HA(L) 3 US NAVY SEAWOLVES] Interesting film of our mission in the delta 

Hey guys, 

This is a early documentary narrated by Raymond Burr (Perry Mason) that took place in mid to late 1967 before the establishment of OP SEA LORDS in late 1968 when the River Patrol Force doubled in size and scope with 120 additional Mark II PBRs arriving in country and joined the 130 MKI PBRs that are shown in this accurate historical documentary. The Mobile Riverine Force and Naval Support Activity had also doubled by late 1968 after Tet and Zumwalt took command of the force and sent our patrols up the canals and small rivers into long controlled enemy waters. 

In the early days the Brown Water War was in the Rung Sat, My Tho and along the main rivers like the Mekong and Bassac Rivers always up to the Cambodian Border. But after Tet things changed and in October 1968 they combined the three Naval Task Forces into OP SEA LORDS and tasked our River Rats and 9th Infantry into long infested enemy territories and the fighting was fierce. 

The Swifts and Coast Guard helped by covering the large rivers while the PBRs of the River Patrol Force and Heavies of the Mobile Riverine Force pushed up the Rach Gia Canal, the Vinh Te Canal and the Grand Canal then OP Slingshot aggressively pushed up the Vam Co Tay and Vam Co Dong Rivers and then OP Ready Deck on the upper Saigon River and 1969 was the worst year of the river War.

 In late 1969 we were performing regular patrols in the Plain of Reeds, U-Minh, Nam Cam and Iron Triangle not to forget the River Rats operating up in I Corps supporting the Marines by the DMZ. By the end of 1970 we had hurt them bad in the delta and there was no place safe for the VC to hide. We were mostly fighting the NVA who were coming down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. 

However, this view of the early war is very good and those guys did a hell of a good job and paved the way for us that served later. We will forever be in their debt. Ralph 

From:  Mike  ? ? ? 
To:  Ralph  ;   Monday, January 07, 2013
       Doug Taylor
Subject:  [HA(L) 3 US NAVY SEAWOLVES] Interesting film of our mission in the delta 
               

Ralph--got this from SEAWOLF Doug Taylor;  narrated by Raymond Burr;  take care my BROTHER
             [HA(L) 3 US NAVY SEAWOLVES] Interesting film of our mission in the delta 

Jan 7 Interesting film of our mission in the delta Jungle River & Swamp Navy Vietnam War - [OFFICIAL FULL] U.S. Navy Documentary www.youtube.com The U.S. Navy Small Boat division battles Viet Cong forces on the jungle rivers and swamps of Vietnam.
                               Mike


Subject: Fw: [HA(L) 3 US NAVY SEAWOLVES] Interesting film of our mission in the delta 

Hey guys,    Good Morning All, 


The part about Gamewarden operations at Nha Be was with River Section-543 as the Gunner getting out of the Forward Gun Mount of the PBR was GMG3 Dan Kleinhesselink and was at the Patrol briefing who I served with in both RS-543 and 535. The part that was down at Binh Thuy was with River Section-511 and the area they showed was some action was down by Purple Heart Alley on the Bassac River. 

B/R's to All,       Ralph 

This is a early documentary narrated by Raymond Burr (Perry Mason) that took place in mid to late 1967 before the establishment of OP SEA LORDS in late 1968 when the River Patrol Force doubled in size and scope with 120 additional Mark II PBRs arriving in country and joined the 130 MKI PBRs that are shown in this accurate historical documentary. The Mobile Riverine Force and Naval Support Activity had also doubled by late 1968 after Tet and Zumwalt took command of the force and sent our patrols up the canals and small rivers into long controlled enemy waters. 

In the early days the Brown Water War was in the Rung Sat, My Tho and along the main rivers like the Mekong and Bassac Rivers always up to the Cambodian Border. But after Tet things changed and in October 1968 they combined the three Naval Task Forces into OP SEA LORDS and tasked our River Rats and 9th Infantry into long infested enemy territories and the fighting was fierce. The Swifts and Coast Guard helped by covering the large rivers while the PBRs of the River Patrol Force and Heavies of the Mobile Riverine Force pushed up the Rach Gia Canal, the Vinh Te Canal and the Grand Canal then OP Slingshot aggressively pushed up the Vam Co Tay and Vam Co Dong Rivers and then OP Ready Deck on the upper Saigon River and 1969 was the worst year of the river War. In late 1969 we were performing regular patrols in the Plain of Reeds, U-Minh, Nam Cam and Iron Triangle not to forget the River Rats operating up in I Corps supporting the Marines by the DMZ. By the end of 1970 we had hurt them bad in the delta and there was no place safe for the VC to hide. We were mostly fighting the NVA who were coming down the Ho Chi Minh Trail. 

However, this view of the early war is very good and those guys did a hell of a good job and paved the way for us that served later. We will forever be in their debt. Ralph 


On Tue, Jan 8, 2013 

To: Good Morning All, 

In the movie, the scene about Gamewarden operations at Nha Be was with River Section-543 as the Gunner getting out of the Forward Gun Mount of the PBR was GMG3 Dan Kleinhesselink and was at the Patrol briefing who I served with in both RS-543 and 535. 

The scene in the movie that was down at Binh Thuy was with River Section-511 and the area they showed was some action was down by Purple Heart Alley on the Bassac River. 

B/R's to All,      Ralph 


 

 

Fw: [HA(L) 3 US NAVY SEAWOLVES] Interesting film of our mission in the delta I

From:  rhfries  [at]  pacbell  DOT  net 
To:     Doc RIojas

Good Morning Doc, 

I had just completed a brief 9 day NIOTS' PBR Engineering Familiarization course at Mare Island, Vallejo, CA on 5/28/67. I departed Travis AFB, CA on the afternoon of 5/29/67 on board a commercial airliner for Vietnam, arriving Tan Son Nhut AFB in the late afternoon of 5/31/67. 

Reported to Commander River Squadron-5 at Saigon in the morning of 6/1/67 and in the afternoon to my first duty station as a WO1 as Logistic/Maintenance Officer with River Section-543. I served with River Section-543 with MK 1 PBR's from 6/1/67 to 8/31/67 at Nha Be.

 I served with River Section-535 MK II PBR's from 9/1/67 thru activation on 10/18/67 at Nha Be in becoming operational combat unit of 10 new boats. 

We departed NSA Nha Be on 12/13/67, arriving NSA Binh Thuy Navy Base on 12/15/67, located on the Bassac River in the heart of the Mekong Delta. 

Our unit departed NSA Binh Thuy on 4/1/68, arriving on board APL-55/YRBM-18 on 4/2/68, located on the Ham Luong River near Ben Tre.

 I departed River Section-535 on 5/29/68 and departed Vietnam from Tan Son Nhut AFB on board a commerical airliner on 5/30/69. I arrived Travis AFB, CA on the afternoon of 6/1/68 where my wife met me with civilian clothes.  I did not to  leave the air terminal off the base in uniform because of all the anti-American demonstration going on outside the Main Gate. 

You may any part of what I have sent to you, 

Ralph J. Fries CWO-3 USN Ret 

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 


Patrol Boat River (PBR) in Vietnam

 

 

 

 

                                    
                                                     Red Dog                                                      Williams

 

 

From: Glen Grinage
EN3 BSU-1, To: Doc Riojas


Grinage was the STAB driver with SEALs in MyTho Vietnam 

to me A Reverie: 

If Moose Boitnott were alive today he wouldn't have the slightest idea of the person writing these words, for it is doubtful he even looked in my direction throughout the brief time frame he transitioned out of My Tho, Vietnam back to the United States in late 1967. 

We, the members of Boat Support Unit 1--based out of Coronado, California--arrived earlier in My Tho than did the Seventh Platoon of SEALS whom we had been assigned to operate with, thus providing us the opportunity to observe firsthand three or four operations conducted by Boitnott and his Fourth Platoon. 

Prior to one such operation, I and a black E-6 sergeant from US Ninth Infantry at Dong Tam 
(he had been called on to instruct us on the operation and maintenance of a 106 recoilless rifle) wandered over to the mess hall at the Victory Hotel to grab a bite, and as we chowed down, Boitnott came strolling in to eat. It was then that I nodded in the direction of Boitnott and told the sergeant that he was the officer in charge of the SEAL team. Notwithstanding, the sergeant looked steadily at Boitnott and opined in a low voice: "He's a mean man; he's one mean son of a bitch." 

A later development proved that the sergeant wasn't far off with his assessment. After Boitnott and his team had been safely extracted from the jungle, and back on the mike boat, Boitnott, with what seemed to be an irrevocable expression of joy, removed a magazine from a rusty old M-1 carbine, took out the first bullet and used it to eject the remaining rounds as he counted them and took notes on a small piece of paper. Another member of the team replied to my inquiry by saying that Boitnott had zapped the elder VC through the head as he held the carbine. 

All I did was simply stand by and goggle at his actions and demeanor. 

N.B. I do indeed hope that the black sergeant from Dong Tam lived to return to his home in America; he was a true warrior and a great guy to serve with.

 

 

 

                    JON FISCHMAN  USN   PBRs  Vietnam Veteran

 

                                
Twenty-eight years later I retired as a CWO4, after serving nearly thirty-one years in the Navy.  Just a basic Squid, mostly Tin Can’s and Cruisers.  

                             
This is a photo Jon Fischman, a Seaman attached to River Section 532 in My Tho in 1967.  This is where I first met up with members of SEAL Team Two (Doc Rio, Patches, Eagle, Kelly, Roy, LT Pete, and Ray)     Were we ever this young?


From:Jon Fischman 
To:    Doc Riojas

Subj: Do you remember sometime around Oct/Nov 1967..... 

Late one afternoon, the boat crew's were getting ready for night patrol. it must have been about 1500 or so. A shot rang out in the Carter Hotel, second floor front. The whole place went to GQ, no one knew what was going on. The compound locked the gate, bunkers manned, guys with guns running to various posts. 

The one of "our" sailor's walked out of his room, 12GA in hand, dropped the slide back, ejected a spent round and just turned around and went back into his room. We followed expecting to see a dead sailor or something.........We looked around an saw this hugh hole in the wall above the window......"got him, I nailed the sob." I don't remember if it was Johnson (ST) or one of our guys grabbed the gun away from him, and asked if he were out of his mind. SN Gerkins just looked him dead in the face and told him "that god danm lizard just pissed me off. He made his last trip up my wall!." 

One of the chiefs came in and contiuned to rip him a new AH......"Why didn't you just use the M79? Gerkins just looked down and "sorry chief.....no ammo." 

Most of us wanted to deck him, but we were laughing so hard ......... 

Ah the life of a river rat................ 

Jon

                       
After retirement went back to school again. Became a Paramedic and went to work for the National Park Service as a Ranger/Rescue/Flight Medic. Worked in the Grand Canyon, Grand Teton's and the Presidential Range in NH.

 Nothing in my Naval Career really prepared me for what lay ahead. Long and Short Haul Rescue (hang under a helo inflight,) repelling and climbing sheer cliffs, getting chased down a mountain trail by Mountain Goats, encountering Bears, and being stalked by a Mountain Lion. Climbing, and searching in 100F plus temps, with a 48 pound pack, and babysitting an injured climber at 9000 feet at -20F. 

And then there is the most dangerous critter of all, "The Tourist" One thing I have to say. Park Rangers are by far; second only to SEAL's, one of the tightest groups of people it has been my privilege to have work with or for. 

So back to school. Became a Scrub  and now working the Operating Room. Still working part-time as a Paramedic, and still love it.

                This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 

 

 

From: Jon Fischman 
email: 19nov2012 

to me Doc I do not know if you remember the night of the "un-mortor attack in My Tho? 

It was early July 1968. It was one of those nights we received a new movie. 16MM double reeler. New release. John "The Duke" Wayne in the Green Berets. Anyway the messhall was packed. guys were sitting on tables and what chairs we had, other sat on the deck or just lined the walls. Vol too loud, too many gugs giving running commentary, just a bunch of sailor's enjoying the flick. 

Anyway, about half way through the second reel, the sentery from the gate bunker came running in yelling "Incoming, Incoming!" 

Guys started yelling at him to shut up and get out of the way. It was the big battle scene......he ran to the back of the room and pulled the plug. with the movie off, the yells started again, but this time did not last too long.....wamp....wamp, I don't know who yelled "incoming, everyone down" Charlie dumped about 10 rounds into the city. we missed all but the last two. 

Then one of our brightest sailors plugged the projector back in and announced, "well crap (or words to that effect) too late now, might as well watch how the "Duke" would handle this situtation........." 

Moral: When watching the Duke, put extra sandbags around the windows.

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 

 

From: Jon  
To: Doc Riojas Date: 03Octy2013
Subj: Three Fingers VN Kid


Anyway, do you remember a shoeshine boy from the Victory Hotel we called "three fingers?" He lost the pinkie and ring fingers on his left hand. 

Well I ran into one of PBR sailor's from 533, they were in My Tho with us, and he told me that the "Kid" in now a practicing Attorney in of all places Kansas City, MO 

He has a policy, He defends Sailor for free (they are always innocent,) charges double for Army, and won't defend Marines (they are always guilty)

Jon

 

 

 

 

 

From: Jon Fischman
To: Doc RIojas
date: 18NOV2012


RIO, There is one thing I want to make sure that others know; I know you do. When Ruth invited me to the Muster, it was to meet up with old friends.

I made sure that she knew that I am, nor ever was a member of any team, SEAL, UDT or other, just a boat driver. And I honestly hope that no one there got any other impression.
I would like to think that I will be invited back someday. I am a River Rat, proud of it, and proud that I had the opportunity to live and work with the Team's.

Hell, back then the only way to tell us apart was that green crap you guys smeered on your hands and face.
We lived, worked and played together.
I hope you understand where I am coming from.


Jon

 

 

To: Doc Rio From:Jon Fischman 
24Nov2012 

 Doc, I got the impression that you were looking for things to add to you "Hobby" collection. 

Attachment is once event I was involved in and actually took a few pictures. I was the fwd gunner on PBR 124 when you "guys" took us for a ride up a little canal. it took days to get all that mud and gunk off the boat.

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

One of the events I remember, and documented happened back on the Ham Long River    The date was 29 March 1968.  Six PBR’s from River Section 532 embarked on the Huntingdon Cty together with members of SEAL Team 2 7plt, acting on intel gather a day or two before decided to relieve a VC Village of their weapons.  We got underway just before first light. 

                             

Then four of the boats entered a very narrow canal to transit to the village.  Where we inserted the teams.

                                   

We loaded what could be carried and with the falling tide, and excess weight we had to exit the canal before all of the weapon and documents could be loaded.

 

           

Heading back out to the river.                     

                                

SEAL Team 2 Inspecting there catch.

                                  

This is the portion carried on PBR 124.

        

And what we could not load and carry out, you guys “make go boom”

     Jon Fischman 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Jim Dickson
To: Doc Riojas
Cc: Franklin Anderson Sent: Wednesday, October 08, 2008
Subject: Re: Vietnam War story 

Hi Doc, 

I've heard about you for a while now and it's good to finally make contact. Oh yes, the story is true alright. I was one of three non-SEALs aboard the Mike boat that night. The other two were an EN2 whose name I can't remember (he kept the engines running and was a good coxswain) and LCDR McCullough who along with CDR V.C. Wandres was an advisor to Vietnamese RAGs 22 & 28 so he knew the rivers in the Rung Sat as well as anyone.

 CDR Wandres wore several hats. He was Commander Task Group 116.2, Third Riverine Area Advisor and Senior Advisor, Rung Sat Special Zone. I was his yeoman and had put in a special request chit to crew on the Mike boat. 7 OCT 66 was my sixth time out. 

Enclosed are three photos. The first is Mighty Mo. Photo credit should go to Jerry Clark, SEAL team one who was in Nha Be' in 1967. He and I exchanged email about seven years ago. 

Jim Dickson

 

 

 

                                    PBR105 Lead 

                                           

10/14/12 
http://5dayecho.u.yuku.com/


Some of you know; by emails,
Bruce Cullen, an MRF BC.

 Bruce alerted me to a static display of a MKI PBR that was in SC, wasting away in a puddle of algae covered water. The PBR was being displayed with the hull number 105. PBR105 was the MOH awardee, Bos'n Williams.

 Sadly, the boat is painted haze grey, and just sits unprotected at Patriot Pt, in Charleston. I called on PBR sailors nationwide to see if there was something we could do to restore 105 to a condition that would make Bos'n Williams proud. In two weeks the address group, PBR105, has grown to over 100 PBR sailors, including the officers from SBT 22.

 At the same time, one of 535's sailors in Calif., brought to our attention the condition of the MKII PBR at Mare Island. One of ours is repainting that PBR (I think the teeth will be painted over) and it will be towed to Sonoma CA to be displayed alongside the Moving Wall next month. 

Thanks to Bruce, two PBRs will get restored and take a place of honor at museums at Mare Island and somewhere here in the south east. I'll try to post some before and after pics -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albert Maxon R.I.P.

Albert Cleo Maxson departed to patrol in Heaven on July 15, 2012 after a long battle with health problems. He was born March 14, 1943 in Flagler, Colorado to Cleo E. and Frances A. Maxson. He was the eldest of four children. He graduated from Minidoka High School in 1961 and shortly after joined the Navy. He remained in the Navy for 30 years, serving in Vietnam and on several ships. He was awarded several recognitions including the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He was one of the very few privileged to wear the black beret.

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 12:35 PM,
From: Ken Delfino <allegedly_retired  [at] colfaxnet   DOT  com>
To: Doc Riojas docrio45 [at] gmail DOT com
subj: Lowell Dickey 

Bacsi,
If you're referring to Lowell Dickey (RIP), Da phai!!!...he was in 533,
but we weren't on the same patrol. I think he was the snipe on PBR 147 which ran with 132.
I was on152 and we ran with 160.
Hope all's well for you down in Texas!

All the best
.... Ken

 

 

From: FRANK R. SPATT 
To:  Doc Riojas AM 
Subj:  Why no beret on your picture? 

                                                         
  Because there was no infrastructure in place yet for us to get standardized pieces of clothing and equipment. We were the first PBR group in My Tho and one of the first in country (1966) .  some of us wore greens that we picked up during CONUS and Subic training, some wore pieces from Marines or Army . 

The beret wasn't yet available unless you wanted to have one made in town. There were no river charts that had been updated since the French lost their ass at Dien Bien Phu. Everything was being done from scratch so to speak. This picture was probably taken in 67 during a day patrol.   Can see the wear and tear on the flag. I believe later units had access to berets with their section's insignia and all that. We weren't concerned with looking pretty at that time, just wanted to learn the rivers, develop tactics (there were none written since the civil war), and do our jobs. 

Besides, wearing berets once back in the chickens s hit navy wasn't authorized so what was the point anyway. My son and his family left today and are driving to Texas and then to Virginia and then heading back to Naples, Italy. 

I haven't forgotten about writing a couple of "sea" stories .  I just need to catch up on some medical stuff during the next few days.  Getting  to old age stuff sucks. 

Cheers and yak at ya' another time. 

Frank

 


BMC Williams and Frank R. Spatt

 

 

 

 

The tale of One Shot Charlie 

There was a spot on the Mekong between My Tho and Vinh Long, just a little south of the Ham Luong river where a shooter (I won't call him a sniper because he didn't have a high powered rifle and he never hit anyone) would take one shot at our boats when they were out on night patrol. He never fired during the daytime.

  In the beginning, all of the boats used to fire back -- M-79s and 50s -- but apparently he had a hidey hole that he jumped into after he would get off a shot. After a while, we figured that he was firing his one shot, not to hit anyone, but to alert other VC further up the river that boats were on the way so we stopped wasting our ammo on him. 

Well, one night, I was going out on patrol approaching "One Shot"s area when a pair of helos came up on the radio stating that they were getting low on fuel, were still loaded with all their ordnance and wanted to know if I could find them a target. I responded that I would try to draw out some fire and loaded an M16 with tracers -- when we got to the usual point where One Shot was likely to be, I fired about half a dozen rounds in his direction, hoping that he would respond. 

Well, lo and behold, there was a flash, and a Pop, One Shot did squeeze off a round. The helos, hovering right above my boat unleashed all their stuff, guns and rockets, it was a terrific display of firepower. Before the smoke had cleared, the helos thanked me for the target and departed the scene. 

We stayed in the area for a few minutes and after all the smoke had drifted away, there came one more flash and a Pow from One Shot. He was letting us know that Nyah, Nyah, you missed Me! 

We laughed about this the rest of the night. As far as I know, One Shot was still alive up until the time I left My Tho in '67. I hope that he survived the war and has had the opportunity to tell this story from his perspective to his grandchildren. This is a sea story and not a fairy tale.

 

 

         

 

                    

 

                                        

 

                                  

 

 
     Cagle on Minigun SEAL Mike Boat

 

 

    

 

                                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      A PBR to be Proud of !

From: Glen [mailto:fyrecap10@aol.com]
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 12:36 PM
To: aocanas1@tx.rr.com
Subject: PBR in Coronado 

Pictures of Coronado PBR repair and paint . You may have already recieved this if not enjoy..


Glen Slay
-----Original Message-----
From: Heinz Hickethier <president@tf116.org>
To: 'Heinz Hickethier' <president@tf116.org>
Cc: tomarmga <tomarmga@bellsouth.net>; nancyre <nancyre@yahoo.com>
Sent: Mon, Jul 2, 2012 9:20 am
Subject: PBR in Coronado 

All Pass this to your members. 

FACEBOOK Nancy please add this to face book if possible extract all the photos and text from the word document and place it in facebook in one piece. Last resort one photo and attachment of PDF. 

WEBPAGE Tom same thing for the web site. 

JIM after you present the certificates and PBR pins to the SN’s photos please. 

If you have not signed up for Branson --- get hot. September is coming up soon. Thanks All 

QMCS Heinz Hickethier Ret National President Gamewardens Association Inc. Vietnam to Present P.O. Box 1846 Belfair WA 98528-1846 www.tf116.org National Web site www.gamewardensnw.org NW Chapter web site 
1 866 220 7477
   
               This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 

 

 

                          

 

 

 

   
Walt "RedDog" Fanton                                                                          Pancho  O Canas

 

  Best kept Secret in the U.S. Navy !

They call it the “E-ticket Ride:” a 33-foot Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) vs. Mother Nature. Middle of the night, almost pitch black; a pair of RHIBs race through open waters of the Pacific Ocean.

 The crew wears night vision gear, but still find it hard to see the waves. Each ocean swell–unpredicted– creates a ramp and sends the craft airborne for what seems like seconds at a time. And when they come down, they come down hard. 

The crew braces for shock, the boat shudders and a giant plume of boat wash is the only mark left in the faint moonlight as the boat races forward into harm’s way.

 

 

   WO1 R.J. FRIES, River Section 535  

 

 

 

The 1st set of pictures, one when I was with River Section 535 and the other from River Section 543. The other set of pictures displays the gun mounts I manufactured for my 10 PBR's that we received on a sugguested from GMG3 Thomas Craghead who happen to be River Section-535 first casualty to our unit's operations on February 4, 1968. The other picture with that pictures show how I welded them on the PBR's engine splinter shields for the mounts to hold the 7.62 M-60 Machine gun and MK18 Honeyweld 60mm grenade launcher. 

River Section-535 was the first unit in all the Delta to have that capabilty as well as the after.50 ammo can carrier that I made to hold 500 rounds vice 100 that came with the boats. The improvements on Crag's suggestion saved many PBR's sailors lives to becoming a casualty because of his idea on the weaponry on board that gave many a Gunner's a fighting chance when they were ambushed and clearing the kill zone because of the additional ammo to fire back with out re-arming as they cleared the area. The improvement reduced our serious casualties by about 50%. 

Colt Arms representative for the Navy interviewed me at the Nha Be Pier in November of 1967 on who authorized me to make those changes. I told him, my guys did. The changes were life savers for them. He asked me if I had any drawings of the improvements. I said, it was all in my head as I had the vision on what Crag idea's were to make the improvements. 

By the time of the second group of PBR's that came in country in 1968 had those improvements on them. 

B/R Bro, 

             Looking at the picture and background with the PBR's in line was taken I believe in December of 1967 when River Section-535 was transiting down the Soi Rap River when the unit was moving from Nha Be to Binh Thuy. If you look very close to the engine splinter shields are the welded pipe stanchions I welded to make the mounts for the M-60 and MK-18 Honeyweld, Also the after .50 gun mount can that I manufactured to hold 500 rounds vice 100 rounds on the MKII PBR's we received after our unit activated on 10/18/67. RS-535 was the only unit in the Delta at that time had the upgrade gun mounts on the new MKII PBR's at that time. 

I believe this picture may have been taken was from PBR-727 by SN Kenneth Quinlan because the first boat in the column was PBR 722 with the OIC LT Jack Doyle on board followed by PBR-723, 724, 725, 726. I was on 731, the last in the column during our move to Binh Thuy. 

Thanks and B/R to my Bros, 

Ralph;  rhfries  [at]  pacbell  DOT  net

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm    



 

 

A report on the operations of the U.S. Navy's small boats in Vietnam. Uniquely designed to meet the challenges of river and coastal warfare, these boats ran patrols under enemy fire and spearhead invasions in enemy-held river territory.

 

 

Who sent me these Photos?

 

 

 

       
                                                      
Fredand SydnyPerryman

 


Front Gate  naval support base NHA BE, home of PBRs

 


Kelly, Burnett, 

 

email:   docrio45  [at] gmail  DOT com if  you can ID these guys and who emailed them to me. THanks

email:   docrio45  [at] gmail  DOT com if  you can ID these guys and who emailed them to me. THanks

 

 

  SEASTORY:1966 SEAL Team ONE ambushed in the Rung Sat

                      
                                     Note the .50 Cal M.Gun on the stern.

From: Ken Delfino [mailto:   allegedly_retired  [at]  colfaxnet  DOT com] 

To: Miller, HON Randy & Ginny 

Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2011 

Subject: Re: 7 OCT 66 ,  SEAL Team One ambushed in the Rung Sat , Vietnam

Hi Randy, I thought I'd send this story from one of your predecessors. I met Jim a few years ago at the dedication of the Cupertino Veterans' Memorial. I'll send you a couple of photos of it with Jim and me in it. I hope all's well in Taft. 

Ken 


Sent: October 7 

  Subject: 7 OCT 66 

1966 : SEAL Team One ambushed in the Rung Sat 

Mighty Mo, SEAL Team One's heavily armed Mike boat (LCM) is ambushed in the Rung Sat Special Zone, a four hundred square mile mangrove swamp surrounding the main (Long Tau R.) and alternate (Soi Rap R.) shipping channels between Saigon and the South China Sea. 

On friday night, 7 OCT 66, Mighty Mo was on the upper Dong Tranh River. Also on the same river was a force in excess of 150 NVA inroute to attack the PBR base at Nha Be'. (This was revealed in documents captured in a later SEAL operation.) When the NVA heard Mighty Mo's engines they quickly set up an ambush on both sides of the narrow river. The first shot was a direct hit amidships with a mortar round. The SEALs and crew of Mighty Mo responded with five .50 caliber machine guns, two .30 calibers, a mortar and a recoilless rifle. When the battle was over everyone aboard the Mike boat was wounded and fifty-eight enemy were dead. 


I remember parts of that night very well. We were at our battle stations (mine was the stern .50 cal behind the pilot house) straining to see or hear anything in that dark calm night. The engines were turning as slowly and quietly as possible. It was the loudest quiet I have ever heard. 

Then suddenly they scored a direct hit with a mortar round and both river banks erupted with gunfire. Nobody gave the order to return fire--we just did. (Couldn't have heard it anyhow.) Because I was on the stern I remember the smell of the diesel exhausts and the canvas canopy burning above my head and of course the noise level. It was the loudest night of my life. 

I remember alternating fire from one river bank to the other while trying my best to fire in short five round bursts. Schapnel from an exploding recoilless rifle round penetrated my helmet and I was knocked out instantly. I was reloading at the time so I was looking down. If I had been looking forward it would have hit me in the face. (Lucky me.) 

I temporarily regained consciousness while they were puting me on a helicopter. Although it had died down considerably the fire fight was still going on. Again I briefly regained consciousness at the Third Field Hospital, Saigon where a chaplain was giving me the Last Rites. Within one hour of getting wounded I was being operated on by an Army neurosurgeon. When I woke up three days later the ward was full of guys from the Mike boat. 

Among the first to notice that I was awake were LCDR McCullough, BM1 Roger Moscone and an EN2 whose name I can't remember. They were standing at the foot of my bed with smiles on their faces so I knew that I would pull through. LCDR McCullough had one of those honorable John Wayne type leg wounds that enabled him to hobble around the ward with the aid of a cane to visit his men. I heard that some years later he made Captain. Good for him. He was a good officer. 

I crossed paths with a lot of heroes that night and owe them my life. Among them are whoever put a battle dressing on my head, the guys who put me on the chopper, the guys who stayed at their stations and returned fire, the helicopter crew who landed at night in a fire fight and everyone at the Third Field Hospital, Saigon. 

Army Medics have told me that most head wounds in Vietnam died. I would have been lucky to live another forty-two minutes. It has turned into forty-two years and except for dead brain cells that affect my memory I'm still going strong. Evey day since then has been something extra. Even "bad days" could be worse. 


Jim Dickson 


 

  ----- Original Message ----- 

Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 11:26 PM 

Subject: RE: 7 OCT 66, SEAL Team One ambushed in the Rung Sat  

Ken, 

I'm a little confused by Jim's story. I was the second BSU-1 group to go to Na Bhe in Sept/Oct 67 and rotate out in Apr 68. The first group arrived in Mar/Apr 67 with the Mighty Mo and two all metal LCSC 's that looked like PBR's and 2/3 Boston Whaler's. I didn't think we or the Seals had any assets in Na Bhe earlier than that. Our Mo had 3- 50's on each side, 2 -30 cal's and 2 - grenade launchers in the pilot House, an 81mm motor near the ramp, and we added a 106 recoilless on the canopy over the well deck during my tour. There was barely room to walk around the back of the pilot house but no room for a 50. I believed that I was one of the first BSU-1 members wounded, and that was on the night of 4-11-68. We had another group down on the Mekong Delta with nearly the same set up. Was he part of a riverine unit because his MO doesn't sound like one of our boats ?? Was he a Seal ?? Our boats were completed and finished up on a LSD on the way to Viet Nam in 67. I don't remember any talk of BSU personnel in the Rung Sat or the Delta earlier than 67, prior to that all personnel were rotating out of the PT boat base in Danang. Just doesn't seem to add up, I'm losing some brain cells too. 

Randy 


Re: 7 OCT 66 , SEAL Team One ambushed in the Rung Sat 

Inbox:  Ken Delfino to me

Hi Doc, 

Don't know which address is still good for you so I sent this to both! I have two questions for you based on the following thread. 
1 - Were you in-country (and at Nha Be) when I witnessed this Mike boat display? 
2 - Did you know Jim Dickson or Randy Miller? Jim has shown up at a few veterans events as well as our Gamewardens Reunion last fall. I know Randy through our Kiwanis involvement...he is the mayor of his city in Taft, CA Thanks Doc, Ken ----- Original Message ----- Sent: Thursday, June 16, 2011 12:17 PM Subject: Re: 7 OCT 66 

Randy, I don't know Jim that well, other than what he's told me. He did attend our last reunion and seemed to know several of the guys. I didn't get up to Nha Be until 12/66 so I didn't know him there (of course, no guarantee that I would have REMEMBERED him...same 'brain cell reduction problem)! I can tell you that my first exposure to the Nha Be SEAL team (or wherever they were from) was when we were still based out of Cat Lo. We were on a day patrol and saw a Mike boat coming down river (Lower Long Tau). I was wondering why they had painted a big black "X" on the bow....until the boat got closer and I saw it was a VC tied spread-eagle to the bow ramp! Pretty impressive first exposure to those guys! That was in November '66, and I don't know where that team was from. When we moved to Nha Be, they did have a team there and one of those nuts had a pet python! We left Nha Be for My Tho sometime around May '67. There's a friend of mine, Doc Riojas, who may be able to answer this question and I'll bring him in on this.

  Ken

 




From: Erasmo "Doc" Riojas 

to : Robert Stoner, Ken DelFino

Subj: RE: Re: 7 OCT 66 , SEAL Team One ambushed in the Rung Sat 

  Thank you Ken. 

No, I do not remember those names. They were ST-1 SEALs, and also the year was 1966.  I was in CONUS.

I was not with a SEAL Platoon in NhaBe, I went out on Ops with the ST-2 SEALs whenever i had the urge to "operate." 

docrio [at]  warpspeed1.net changed that is, they route their emails through GOOGLE.COM, so i got a google email also: docrio45[at]  gmail.com. The warpspeed email is still a good one. I also have docrio [at] sealtwo.org 

Thanks shipmate.   Rio

About the snake, "Zelmo" that belonged to Jim Glasscock, ST-2, some PBR guy poured gasoline on it's head and burned it pretty bad. Jim brought it to Saigon and I cured the burns and Zelmo lived. Jim did not return back to 'nam before i left, so i took zelmo back to NhaBe and gave it to the guys there from Team TWO. There were NO ST-1 guys there at that time, 1970. 

CC: to Bob Stoner, he may be able to help you. 

Erasmo Riojas


from: Ken Delfino  

to: "Erasmo \"Doc\" Riojas" <docrio45@gmail.com> cc Robert Stoner <rstonercrd21 [at]  msn DOT com> 

date :Thu, Jun 16, 2011 at 4:21 PM

 subject Re: 7 OCT 66  

Thanks Doc and Hi Bob! 

I was with RivDiv 533 from 10/66-7/68 (Cat Lo, Nha Be, My Tho) call signs were Seahorse 64, Barracuda something, Michaelangelo Kilo and Druid-something and your name sounds really familiar. Perhaps you might remember LTjg Dick Strandberg, LTjg Frank Yusi, 

QMC Frank Jackson or RD1 Wilbur Cosson? They were four of my patrol officers. We (PBRs 152 and 160) did a lot of inserts and extracts with your teams as did PBRs 112 and 153.

 Anyway, neither Randy nor Jim were SEALs...they were crew on Mighty Mo. I've seen "in-country" photos of Randy (Nha Be barracks), but don't know that much about Jim. I hope all is well with you....it's been a while. Thanks for your help gentlemen. Ken

 

JIM Dickson 
07Oct2013 

Today, 7 OCT 2013, is the 47th anniversary of my being wounded in Vietnam. If I remember correctly all twenty-eight (three of us were not SEALs) aboard the Mike boat were wounded but nobody died. I was one of five head wounds. The other four were SEALs two of whom ended up in wheel chairs. After the battle was over fifty-eight enemy were found dead. At twenty-one I was the youngest and about half are still alive. What a great bunch of guys! 

I would rather be a has been than a never was.    JIM Dickson 

WEBMASTER:  I wish you would send those pictures of Randy and Jim to me for www.sealtwo.org.      Thank you ,   Doc Riojas


This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 7 October 1966 incident with the "Mighty Mo"

Robert Stoner Ken me Randy

Hello everyone (and please pass this along to other correspondents involved),

Let me chime-in with some background on the 7 October 1966 incident with the "Mighty Mo" as well as other things.

SEALs got involved in operations in and around Nha Be in early 1966.  To the best of my knowledge, all of the initial operators were from ST-1 in Coronado.  ST-2 got involved in 1967 and they brought with them their own STAB (SEAL Team Assault Boats) that were purposely modified at ST-2 in Little Creek.  These boats were the PowerCat 23, a tri-hull fiberglass boat that mounted two 115 hp Mercury outboards.  This STAB was slightly smaller than the later all-aluminum LSSC.  Doc Riojas remembers operating from the old STAB and some of its problems (like flooding over the transom).  The following photos are from LIFE magazine via Jim Gray.  They show STAB operations from Nha Be in late 1967 or early 1968.  (Doc, do any of these faces look familiar?)

   

 

 

 

 

Anyhow, the members of ST-1 at Nha Be scrounged and modified a Mk 4 LCPL (steel-hulled) and an LCM Mk 6.  The Mk 4 wasn't too heavily modified and may have been discarded early-on.  However, the LCM was heavily modified and it became the "Mighty Mo" as described in the story.  I have been unable to find much on the Mighty Mo other than some photos and a write-up on CPO Herb Ruth (SEAL) who was involved in the fight that night. 

 

 

Above:  CPO Herb Ruth went on to be a commissioned officer.  This is LT Herb Ruth of ST-2 taken at Little Creek.

 

It was a real gunfight with no quarter given by either side.  Herb was attached to ST-1 at the time (he later went to ST-2 and made other deployments to RVN).  CPO Ruth and several other SEALs received decorations for their actions that night and all members of the Mighty Mo received Purple Hearts.  I have not found anyone who can confirm this, but I believe the Mighty Mo was so damaged by the 7 October 1966 battle that it was eventually scrapped.

 

Above: The slightly modified Mk 4 LCPL of ST-1 at Nha Be in early 1967 is very much a jury rigged affair (photo: Chuck LeMoyne)

 

 

Here are photos of the Mighty Mo as it was modified by ST-1:

 

 

Above and below: The "Mighty Mo" under construction at Nha Be in 1966 (photo: Frank Anderson)

 

 

 

Above: The "Mighty Mo" topside looking aft 1966 (photo: Chuck LeMoyne)

 

Below: The "Mighty Mo" beauty shot taken before the 7 October 1966 battle (photo: Jerry Clark)

 

 

Below: Another shot of the "Mighty Mo" alongside an improvised pier in 1966 (photo: "Doc" Riojas)

 

 

One of the outcomes of the 7 October 1966 firefight was that Naval Special Warfare Group decided there was a need for a division of labor aboard the boats that supported SEAL operations.  The result was BSU-1 in Coronado was tapped to provide dedicated boat crews and the SEALs (and UDTs) would do the operational jobs.  In Coronado, BSU-1 converted two LCM-6 and four LCPL Mk 4 into boats for the SEAL/UDT operators.  The conversions were sent to RVN as part of Project ZULU and arrived beginning in March 1967.  Dedicated boat crews in RVN were called MST (Mobile Support Teams).  MST-1 operated from DaNang supporting VNN raids using PTF gunboats; MST-2 operated in the Delta supporting SEAL/UDT operations from various bases.    Initial HSSC/LCPL operations were from Nha Be and Can Tho (later My Tho) in the Delta. 

 

 

Above: The Can Tho/My Tho boat as it appeared in Project ZULU.  Note the two modified Mk 4 LCPLs outboard of the HSSC.  This boat would be heavily modified as the war progressed. (photo: Jim Gray)

 

Below: The Can Tho/My Tho boat in early 1968 before the Mini-gun was added.  Note the increased armor around the engine room that has been added. (photo: Jim Gray)

 

 

 

Above: The Can Tho/My Tho HSSC in 1969 before the addition of bar armor to the forward hull.  The Mini-gun is pointing at the photographer and the Mk 2 81mm mortar is pointed down to keep out water (photo: Don Crawford)

Below: The Nha Be HSSC is high and dry.  Compare the difference in layouts and armoring of the stern compared to the Can Tho/My Tho HSSC (photo: Randy Miller)

 

 

 

Above: The Nha Be HSSC in full portside view.  Note the separate gun tube for the forward firing twin .50 machine guns.  These guns had oversized ammunition boxes.  The Can Tho/My Tho boat had a Mini-gun in a tub at the lip of the top deck.  Both boats had the M40A1 106mm recoilless rifle mounted on the top deck (photo: Ron Allen)

Below: A detail photo of the forward twin .50 machine guns and oversize ammo boxes to feed them (photo: Ron Allen)

 

The Mk 4 LCPLs were heavily used over the next several years and were replaced by the MSSC beginning in 1969.  The LCPLs were all gone by 1970.  The Can Tho/My Tho LCM (now called the HSSC) eventually found its way to SEA FLOAT/SOLID ANCHOR at Nam Can on the Cau Lon River on the Ca Mau Peninsula.  It sank in a storm while tied to the ARL off Square Bay in January 1971.  The other HSSC stayed at Nha Be for most of its operating life, but I don't know what happened to it.  It might have been turned over to the LDNNs when all the MST boat crews and SEALs/UDTs left country in 1971.

 

Speaking of snakes, the three ST-1 platoons at SOLID ANCHOR had a pet python that lived under their hooches and kept the rat population down (and we had some really bigones).  Some idiot poured gasoline on the poor thing, but he recovered.  When ST-1 left country, the snake came with them and went through several owners in Coronado and finally found a home with a SEAL in Imperial Beach.  Unfortunately, the python got out and caused a major fuss.  He was recaptured after about three weeks and was donated to the San Diego Zoo, where he was very happy in retirement.

 

Regards,

Bob Stoner 

WEBMASTER NOTE:

The  SEAL Team TWO 7th Platoon, 1967 home based in MyTho Vietnam had BSU-1 operators and a "Mighty Mo" with a 81 mortar in the well deck forward, a recoiless rife and a mini gun on the flat top. I do not remember a .50 cal. Machine gun aft.


Boynton,Constance,Riojas,Ashton, Matthews, Rowell


TopRow:Lt to Rt: Hook Turre, Jack Rowell, Curtis Ashton, Mike Boynton, Fred Keener, Roy Dean Matthews.  Bottom Row Lt to Rt:  Robert "Eagle" Gallagher, Erasmo "Doc" Riojas, Rinney, Harry Constance, Robert "Pete Peterson , Charlie Jesse.  The Origional ST-2  7th Pltn. Our first tour to MyTho (home base) but operated all over IV CORPs areas of 'nam.

Missing: Gene Fraley , Rinney's handler(KIA), Billy Burbank (transferred to PRUs), W.O.Charlie Watson returned to Little Creek due to Illness.  This photo was taken in MyTho at the PBR base.  Rinney made too much noise in the jungle.  He went on two Ops and was used to interrogate captured VCs.  The photo says May 1968, which is when the film was developed, photo was taken in late 1967.

We relieved "Moose" Boinotte's, "Pee Wee" Nealy's platoon at the Carter Hotel, MyTho RVN 1967.  We had a BSU-1 platoon with us for the Mike Boat and one of the Origional STABs "by Mattell."

SEVENTH Plt, ST-2, 1967-1968:  Best I can remember:  We ran over 100 clandestine Ops in IV Corps RVN. Awards:  14 Combat Action Ribbons,  1 Navy Cross, 2 Silver Stars, 14 Bronze Stars, 12 Purple Hearts (two were refused), 14 VN gallantry Crosses, 12 Navy Achievement Medals and SEAL unit awards, Presidential and Navy.         http://www.militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/recipient.php?recipientid=4405  "Eagle" Gallagher Navy Cross.


On Sat, Jun 18, 2011 
Robert Stoner

wrote: More and more of our former BSU/MST guys are finding their way home at www.warboats.org. 

Given the dangerous op areas we worked, that Dets BRAVO and CHARLIE made it through their tours without any serious injuries. BM2 Austin Moore got a ruptured ear drum from a B-40 hit; GMG2 Dick Kush got hit in the inner thigh by a large chunk of brass when his .50 blew-up, and EN2 Mike Meils was medevaced due to a severe allergic reaction from a second mosquito bite. (The fist got him swelled-up and no duty for a week.) Everyone didn't get a scratch. Damn lucky. 

The Det that relieved us got nailed big time by two B-40s in late January 1971. LT Thames (LDNN advisor) and his LDNN interpreter were killed; LT Bob Natter (MST), his GMG1 and GMGSN were critically wounded and evacuated. Don Crawford (SEAL) brought the LSSC back to SOLID ANCHOR. ----- 


 

From: Erasmo "Doc" Riojas 
To: Robert Stoner ; Glen Grinage Cc: Ken Delfino ; Randy Miller
 Sent: Saturday, June 18, 2011 3:24 PM 
Subject: Re: 7 OCT 66 


I forgot to include GLEN GRINNAGE EN3, our STAB driver, still alive and well in JAPAN ; He did some very hairy OPs with us. What pisses me off you guys did not get hardly any credit for the stuff you survived with SEALs. 

I wish somebody would reverse that and somehow give you guys the medal you deserve. I blame the Boat Support officers that ran your show. They got theirs and you guy s did not even get a hand shake. 

Doc RIojas 


18 JUNE 2011

Robert Stoner 

Any guys, SEALs,  that were as crazy to do the kind of things you did had to be gotten out if you got in trouble.

 We'd have moved Heaven and Earth to extract you if there was a way to do it. Ditto for the Seawolves. 

Brothers protect brothers.


BOB


From:Randy Miller

 to: Robert, Ken, me, Bill  Bob, 

Thanks for the info, guess I started something. I didn't realize Seals were in Nha Be operating their own boats. When I was there from Oct 67 to Apr 68, we had an HSSC (we called the mighty MO), 2 LCPL's and 2/3 Boston Whalers, no Powercat 23's, no STABs.

 Bill Moreo and I drove Whalers on Seal op's numerous times. He came back to Can Tho/My Tho in late 68 with the early version STABS. l I'll try to send you some pic's I have of our BSU/MST-3 dedicated boats. Jim Grey has copies of some of my pictures. It was 45 years ago, so everyone's history gets a little different. No matter what, it was a hell of a time. 

Doc is right, we never got any credit from the Seals in most of their books. We took'em in, floated around and waited for their call, and got them out, every time while I was there. And BSU personnel drove and operated the Nasties out of Danang and we never got credit for that either, it was always the Seals PTF's that was mentioned, not BSU/MST. 

Thanks for all your memories and thoughts, as Bill says, thanks for having my back. 

Your brother in arms, GO NAVY !! 

Randy 
(The Bear) PS: The 4th pic down, the guy with the nice hair I think was a Seal named Martin. The 2nd pic down may be Moreo driving the boat.


fromRobert Stoner  Mon, Jun 20, 2011 at 11:05 AM

to: Ken Delfino 
Erasmo \"Doc\" Riojas
Randy Miller 

Bill Moreo 
im Gray 

Guys

The thing to remember -- now with 40+ years of hindsight -- that everything was in the process of being invented.  When ST-1 got in-country in 1966, they literally had to scrounge boats to operate.  Their modified LCPL and Mike 6 "Mighty Mo" were prime examples.  In these early days, the SEALs crewed their own boats as well as ran operations because no one had thought of a different way to do things!  The 7 October 1966 gunfight got the ball rolling to change this natural division of labor -- boat crew and operators -- and the handoff was made to BSU-1.  Project ZULU was the result and it demonstrated the principle of the separate boat crew plus field operator team that we remember.

 

ST-2 came to RVN in 1967 and they brought the STABs with them.  The PowerCat 23 tri-hull commercial boat was modified in-house by ST-2 at Little Creek and brought over.  As far as I have been able to find out, there were originally three (four?) original STABs.  One STAB never made it out of the U.S. -- while being airlifted by a CH-46 Sea Knight, the cargo straps failed and the boat fell into a parking lot at Little Creek.  The STAB was damaged beyond repair and several cars were destroyed.  The hulk was used for weapon's immunity trials.  The other two (three?) boats came over to RVN with their deploying ST-2 platoon.  STAB operations began in October-November of 1967 and continued for over a year.  Eventually both boats were worn-out and retired.  The replacement was the aluminum LSSC.  [Trivia: The PowerCat STABs in RVN had "STAB I" and "STAB II" painted on the bows in black paint.  You can barely make out STAB I on the bow of this November 1967 photo.]

 

 

Other problems with pinning things down definitively: (1) SEAL/UDT/MST operations were classified and much of what we're now discussing was under wraps for 25 years, (2) as Jim Gray knows -- NSWG cleaned out a lot of files in the mid-1980s and a lot of historical, day-to-day information went to the dumpster, (3) many of the guys -- especially ones who were the early players -- have passed away and can't help.  What's then happened is we're recreating our history as we lived it based on period photos and fading recollections plus some documents of the times that have survived.

 

This one's for you, Doc Rio.  When I was at the GWVN reunion in San Antonio, President John Woody introduced me to Dr. Jim Reckner who heads up the Vietnam studies department at Texas Tech.  Dr, Jim is ex-Navy and served with the 7th Fleet ships off the coast of Vietnam.  I would talk to Jim about your website, because you've got tons of information that will go away if you can't maintain it any longer.  If you want to contact Dr, Jim, I can help you there.

 

Bob


This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 

 

                                                 

 

                                     

 

 

 

 

" Doc Rio, 

hope to catch up with you. Saw "poouch" at gamewardens in Oct. with my pups down at stennis 
SBT 22 good group - trying to get a BSU-1 - MST reunion down there.
Best REgards, Tommmy "leprochaun" Ireland forever
the Moff.
Doc,
after #10 place "Seafloat" turn around from Det "C" to Det "D" got my laundry done. East Coast PLT - Swede, Sham, D. Johnson, T. Shoulders , Mc QUeen, Mc Carthy, Av??y, Daus, David Strong, 3 months with them than Victor PLT West Coast / split tour. Spent a lot of time running down to "Ben Tre" for XRay Plt, Tom Moffatt
Hard luck PLT. Bomar, Collins, Riter, B???y, RIP.

On Wed, Mar 2, 2011
Tommy Moffatt <bsu1mst2 [AT] comcast  DOT net> wrote:
To: docrio@sealtwo.org


DOC

MY NAME IS TOM MOFFATT BETTER KNOWN AS  TOMMY LEPRECHUAN. 
RAN WIYH BILL MCCARTY DENNY BJOHNSON BOB SHAMBERGER RIP DAN MUD ZUMDA RIP. RANGER RICK MY HERO COMES FROM SAME AREA IN NY.
STOLE HIS GIRLS BEFORE HE GOT MY IRISH AMERICAN GIRLS IN YONKERS. 
FORGOT FRED KENNER AND THE MAYOR JIM FINNLEY AND I GOT YOUR ASS OUT OF #10 PLACE SEAFLOAT JUNE 70. 
CHRIS WARD WAS PLT OIC WHEN WE LEFT .
I DONT PLAY BAGPIPES I SING IRISH SONGS. 


THE BEST TO YOU DOC  RIO
 TOMMY LEPRECHUAN

Webmaster's Note: Tommy, i had to break your long sentence into small sentence fragments for easier reading,
                                I   hope that did not piss you off.   Thanks shipmate.

PS:  send more pictures !

 

                                      

 

 

                   

                    
                                                                              Lowell Dickey EN2 PBR

\                                                                 

                           
                                         Lt to Rt.: Garry Hunt, Phil Garn, Jeff Hunter, Dave Hale

 


SBU-22 Minigun

 

This Table is Under construction

PBR HULL NUMBERS AND PATROL CALL SIGNS 

   -----Original Message----- From: Ken Delfino [mailto:philippepinuts@colfaxnet.com] Sent: Monday, April 12, 2010 2:21 AM To: Al O'Canas Subject: Re: PBR HULL NUMBERS AND PATROL CALL SIGNS Hey guys, at one time I had the hull numbers of all the PBR’S in the Nam and what boat they ran with. I don’t remember how I got it, or even if I found it myself. Can anyone, especially the 533 guys, remember the Patrol call signs and what two boats ran together??? I would appreciate any help I can get.“Pancho” As close as I can remember: 
152/160 (my patrol) 
132/147 
112/153 
121/151 
21/149 ? Call signs: Seahorse (out of Cat Lo) Barracuda (out of Nha Be....I think) Michaelangelo (My Tho) Druid ( off one of the LSTs) and that's all I can remember... Kenny -----Original Message----- From: Dick Godbehere [mailto:gsd.hawaii@hawaiiantel.net] Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2010 11:39 PM To: Al O'Canas Subject: Re: PBR HULL NUMBERS AND PATROL CALL SIGNSAloha Al,I can help a little. On 9 Nov 67, PBR 28 was hit with a rocket and sunk between Tan Dinh Island and the river bank near the Catholic Church on the Bassac River several miles south of Can Tho. The boat was hit at the waterline, port side about six inches aft of the front of the engine. PBR 28 was a Mark one and is listed in the 1968 issue of Janes Fighting Ships as being destroyed in Vietnam. My call sign was Handlash Delta. Officers had their own call sign that did not always coincide with the enlisted patrol designator. I do not remember the crews designator for this firefight.Another boat I am aware of is PBR 60 (Mark 1) It was hit by two B-40 rockets on the starboard side and caught on fire the evening of 1 March 1968.  One rocket hit about three feet from the stern and about six inches down from the top of the gunwale. The second rocket hit the grenade locker causing several explosions. The boat was heavily damaged. This action took place on the Bassac River, just east of Cu Lao May Island. The time of the fire fight was about 2000 and it was dark.The patrol designator for this patrol was "Bravo". Again my designator for this patrol was "Handlash Delta".Hope this is the kind of stuff you are looking for. Have a good one.Best regards, Dick Godbehere  -----Original Message----- From: Jim Dickson [mailto:jdickson@aceweb.com] Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 8:13 AM To: Undisclosed-Recipient:; Subject: Re: PBR HULL NUMBERS AND PATROL CALL SIGNSThere are a bunch of call signs on the MRFA website. (link below) When I was on Seal Team One, Det. Golf's Mike Boat out of Nha Be' in SEP & OCT 1966 our call sign was "Moon River." It was later changed to "Porpoise 23."http://www.mrfa.org/callsign.htmJim 

 

 

                       

 

    

   

 

MCPO Robert Stoner's History on SeaFloat and Solid Anchor CaMau Peninsula, Vietnam

http://www.warboats.org/vietnam.htm#stoner

                 
----- Original Message -----
From: Robert Stoner
To: Doc Riojas and Friends
Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 11:03 AM
Subject: RVN Trivia: What's an Ammi Barge? 



I know all of you are all familiar with the term "Ammi" barge. We used them for everything under the sun on the rivers of RVN -- from portable piers, to helicopter landing pads, to fuel and ammo points, to mobile, floating artillery bases, to Advanced Tactical Support Bases -- you name it and the Ammi barge did it. 

But, where did the term "Ammi" come from? Was it an acronym or a real name? 

Actually, it was a shortened name. AMMI barges were named after their designer at NavSea's Carderock Division, Dr. Ammerici. (Information thanks to Lee Wahler.) 



Ammi barges were tied together, anchored and anchored in the rivers to form Advanced Tactical Support Bases. The above photo shows the barges at SEA FLOAT. The below photos show the arrangement at BREEZY COVE and SEA FLOAT. 



ATSB BREEZY COVE at the mouth of the Ong Doc River. 

 


                           

All,  

  Earlier I sent you a brief write-up on the inventor of the Ammi pontoon or barge.  Some of that information was incorrect and I'm correcting the historical record.  The inventor's full name (now spelled correctly) was Dr. Arsham Amirikian.    Attached is a short biography of this outstanding, but little-known civil engineering expert.  As you can see from the biographic sketch, Dr. Amirikian was heavily engaged in the development of the base construction we used in Vietnam.   I want to thank Lee Wahler and Steve Thomas who helped with getting Dr. Arsham Amirikian's name spelling corrected.  

Bob Stoner 

                             Above: Two SEAL support craft of Mobile Support Team 2 are tied to a typical 90x28x5-foot Ammi pontoon in Vietnam.  The nearest boat is a modified LCPL (landing craft personnel, large) and the rear boat is a Light SEAL Support Craft or LSSC.  This photo was taken some time in 1968 or 1969.

                               




ATSB SEA FLOAT in the middle of the Cau Lon River.

Before 25 June 1969, there were no facilities at Nam Can. The first MST detachment at Nam Can was John Engstrom's. Engstrom's MST detachment parked their boats -- an LSSC and LCPL on the beach. 

The first Ammi barges that became SF were brought-in on 25 June 1969. The barges were to be an interim operating base. ADM Zumwalt and the Vietnamese intended to build a permanent shore base at Nam Can. Once the barges were setup and anchored in place, the Seabees and the construction firm of RMK-BJR started building the shore base. The SA base was on the north bank of the Cau Lon River. 



Above: The LSSC of LT John Engstrom's MST detachment is high and dry on the beach at Nam Can. 

There was a ramshackle wood and bamboo bridge to get to them when the tide went out (and keep everyone out of the sucking mud). 


Above: The LSSC of LT Engstrom's MST Det comes alongside the ramshackle pier at Nam Can. 

We (MST-2, Detachment Charlie) had a unique experience at SF/SA because we were there when both operations were going on and we made the transition from the afloat base to the shore base. Everyone -- MST, SEALs, UDT, Naval Support Activity people, etc. -- moved ashore from the SF barges to the new SA base during a four hour window on 4 September 1970. 

Remember your recollection of SF/SA depends upon when you were there. Nam Can was pretty well blown off the map by at least one time -- maybe more -- B-52 "Arc Light" strikes. Each B-52 carried 108 500-pound and 750-pound bombs and would take out 1 square mile of jungle. 

The "lakes" you can see in the first photo behind the early construction on the shoreline were water-filled bomb craters. The Seabees filled them in with sand. [See the second photo taken from SA looking due south.] The surrounding area was actually a mangrove swamp. The January 1971 photo still shows the remains of the bomb craters in the background between the edge of the base and the tree line. There is a huge water-filled bomb crater to the right of the KCS camp across the canal at the east side of the SA base. 

ADM Zumwalt had the area around SF/SA defoliated with Agent ORANGE because the early incursions with the PCF's were just too expensive in terms of casualties and equipment. The tree line was moved back 1,000 yards on both sides of the river. During the rainy season, the bare ground reverted to a swamp, but in the dry season it became sun-baked mud flats. The extent of the defoliation is clearly seen in the January 1971 photo of SA. 

A huge problem with the sand fill for the SA base was the Cau Lon River current -- 6 to 8 knots when the tide was running. The river current carried away the sand shoreline almost as fast as it was offloaded. The Seabees had to drive interlocking steel pilings to retain the sand from being swept out by the current. After the erosion problem was solved, the pilings helped trap sand and silt to give some kind of shoreline. The Seabees put in over $6 million worth of sand to build the base at SA. The construction firm of RMK-BJR brought-in the sand on huge barges towed by tug boats. 

We had several operations run by Vietnamese Marines with USMC advisors while I was at SF/SA. In one instance, they put in a battery of 105mm howitzers directly across from our MST hut after the SF barges were moved out. The ground proved too soft for them and the recoil broke through the sun-baked crust and they were up to their axles in mud. 

The USMC brought in something that looked like a huge trampoline. This "trampoline" was installed underneath the guns. The trampoline absorbed the recoil of the guns and kept them out of the mud. We saw them doing this before we went out on an op and the guns were emplaced the next morning when we returned at daylight. Everybody was beat, so we parked the boats on the beach and went to our hooches to grab some sleep. About 0830 we got a 105mm howitzer wake-up call -- the guns fired a mission DIRECTLY OVER our hooches! Boy, did that get everyone's adrenaline going.

----- Original Message -----
From: Robert Stoner
To: Doc Riojas
Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 12:10 PM
Subject:  Re: RVN Trivia: What's an Ammi Barge? 

Doc, 

The following photo montage shows the development of the base. Compare the original message with this group of photos. You gotta trust me on this one, cause I moved aboard SF on 30 May 1970 and ashore to SA on 4 September 1970. [We departed SA on 16-17 November 1970.] The old SF barges were stripped of building materials by the Vietnamese during the remainder of September and October. The SF barges were moved out to rebuild BREEZY COVE in late October and early November 1970. 

Bob 



Above: Map showing SEA FLOAT/SOLID ANCHOR locations. 



Above: An early photo showing SOLID ANCHOR under construction, looking north and slightly west, with SEA FLOAT in the foreground. The sand fill used by the Seabees to build the base is just beginning for the swampy areas behind the shoreline. Photo taken in late 1969. 



Above: A later photo showing SOLID ANCHOR under construction, looking south, with SEA FLOAT in the background. The base is more developed as indicated by the extensive sand fill. The white barge along the shoreline was used for servicing engines. Photo taken in early 1970. 



Above: A later photo showing SOLID ANCHOR nearly completed, looking northwest. The SEA FLOAT barges were used to rebuild BREEZY COVE (Song Ong Doc) when it was destroyed on 20 October 1970. Photo taken early January 1971. 

26 March 2009

Just before we finished up our tour at SA, we took a daylight recon due west on the Cau Lon River until we came to a large canal several clicks away. We took the canal north and it branched. We took the right branch (now heading east) and then nosed the MSSC into the bank to drop off our SEAL squad. The mangrove trees were thick. The point man hit the water and immediately there were about six snakes that went swimming away! (I decided that I was NOT getting off that boat -- no matter what.) 

The point man walked about 4 to 6 feet into the mangroves and was completely blocked from view. The rest of the squad followed him. We waited while the SEALs did their recon. About an hour and a half later, we got a radio call to come east on the canal to extract the squad. They got back on and we continued until the canal ended to form a T, with the top of the T running due north and south. We took the right (south) leg. 

The south leg took us back to the Cau Lon. As we cleared the mangroves on both sides of the canal, on the right was the SA base and on the left, at the canal mouth, was the KCS camp! We made a complete circle of the SA base on a crossover canal that we'd never gone down before. Wow. 

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

Webmaster's NOTE:   MCPO Gary Smith (SEAL) Ret wrote two books.  Death in the Delta and Death in the Jungle .  In one of those books, he describes the job Doc Riojas was assigned and later Gary was assigned escorting the civilian tug boats who were contracted to bring sand in from the South China Sea to build the ground on which Solid Anchor was to be constructed.  Gary and I rode the two Swift boats with squads of Biet Hi Commandos and Kit Carson Scouts.  The Boss man for that Operation was an EOD Officer LCDR Spinx.   Gary narrates in one of his books that operation and other facts about that period of time at Sea Float.

 

 

 

                sandiegottown.jpg click on it to enlarge.

 

                            
                                                                     Where was NavForV?

 

 

 

               Keith F. Reyes, ULC-UM
                       USN (DV/SWCC/SERE/CM) Ret.
Photos                                                 

                                                             

 

          

                       

Keith F. Reyes,            ULC-UM
USN (DV/SWCC/SERE/CM) Ret.
UDT/SEAL ASSOCIATION
USN/MC EOD ASSOCIATION
GAMEWARDENS TF-116 ASSOCIATION
BLACKWATER ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

                               

             

                 

                   

                                                 
From: Keith F. Reyes
To: E. "Doc"  Riojas
Sent: Friday, June 20, 2008 
Subject:  Transition of the Brown Water Navy to Special Boat Teams.

Yes, Coastal River Squadrons/Divisions, then were re-designated Special Boat Squadrons/Units, now they are designated Special Boat Teams. They evolved to all  the same mission.
SEAL Combat Craft operations  Pacific Northwest. 

I met Ted Kassa several years ago at the UDT/SEAL Northwest Chapter Reunion. I asked him if he wanted to assist in a program I started at Naval Station Everett, Wa. Swimming Pool training young wannabe's. 

We are teaching them all underwater recovery swim strokes (combat swimming) and the PT requirements. We teach them things of this nature, and answer all their questions.
I served from 76-96. 

 Take care.
 Keith

                                                                 

                                                            

                                                          

 

From: Keith Reyes
To: Doc Riojas
Sent: Saturday, June 21, 2008
Subject:    pn-scuba and other patches 

SCUBA Insignia amongst others.  This was just an assortment of Command Insignia's I was assigned to. I was a support diver & combat crewman with EOD Mobile Unit 3 in Coronado.  When  I got to Washington State (Admirals Staff Duty), I did my re-qual dives with EOD Mobile Units 11 & 17 out of NAS Whidbey Island, Wa.
Keith R.

                                                                     Keith F. Reyes

 


Buck Owen

                    

                                  

                                

Bob Stoners Contribution of Boat Photos

 

 

  The SEAL MK V boat                                   

 

 

 

 

 

                    
Lt to Rt: Charlie Bump,  Bill Garnett,  Pierre Ponson   SEAL Team TWO on one of the origional S.T.A.B. boats in the 'nam war games.  Note the width of the river.

        

                            

                           

 Fm:  Jim Dickson   jdickson [at] aceweb.com 
 To: Doc Riojas  docrio45 [at] gmail.com 
 Sent: Wednesday, October 08, 2008  
Subject:  Vietnam War story about ST-1 & "Mighty Mo"

 


                      

 1966 :SEAL Team One ambushed in the Rung Sat


Mighty Mo, SEAL Team ONE's heavily armed Mike boat (LCM) is ambushed in the Rung Sat Special Zone, a four hundred square mile mangrove swamp surrounding the main (Long Tau R.) and alternate (Soi Rap R.) shipping channels between Saigon and the South China Sea. 

On Friday night, 7 OCT 66, Mighty Mo was on the upper Dong Tranh River. Also on the same river was a force in excess of 150 NVA reroute to attack the PBR base at Nha Be'. (This was revealed in documents captured in a later SEAL operation.) When the NVA heard Mighty Mo's engines they quickly set up an ambush on both sides of the narrow river. The first shot was a direct hit amidships with a motar round. The SEALs and crew of Mighty Mo responded with five .50 caliber machine guns, two .30 calibers, a mortar and a recoilless rifle. When the battle was over everyone aboard the Mike boat was wounded and fifty-eight enemy were dead. 

I remember parts of that night very well. We were at our battle stations (mine was the stern .50 cal behind the pilot house) straining to see or hear anything in that dark calm night. The engines were turning as slowly and quietly as possible. It was the loudest quiet I have ever heard. 

Then suddenly they scored a direct hit with a mortar round and both river banks erupted with gunfire. Nobody gave the order to return fire--we just did. (Couldn't have heard it anyhow.) Because I was on the stern I remember the smell of the diesel exhausts and the canvas canopy burning above my head and of course the noise level. It was the loudest night of my life. 

I remember alternating fire from one river bank to the other while trying my best to fire in short five round bursts. Shrapnel from an exploding recoilless rifle round penetrated my helmet and I was knocked out instantly. I was reloading at the time so I was looking down. If I had been looking forward it would have hit me in the face. (Lucky me.) 

I temporarily regained consciousness while they were putting me on a helicopter. Although it had died down considerably the fire fight was still going on. Again I briefly regained consciousness at the Third Field Hospital, Saigon where a chaplain was giving me the Last Rites. Within one hour of getting wounded I was being operated on by an Army neurosurgeon. When I woke up three days later the ward was full of guys from the Mike boat. 

Among the first to notice that I was awake were LCDR McCullough, BM1 Roger Moscone and an EN2 whose name I can't remember. They were standing at the foot of my bed with smiles on their faces so I knew that I would pull through. LCDR McCullough had one of those honorable John Wayne type leg wounds that enabled him to hobble around the ward with the aid of a cane to visit his men. I heard that some years later he made Captain. Good for him. He was a good officer. 

I crossed paths with a lot of heroes that night and owe them my life. Among them are whoever put a battle dressing on my head, the guys who put me on the chopper, the guys who stayed at their stations and returned fire, the helicopter crew who landed at night in a fire fight and everyone at the Third Field Hospital, Saigon. 

Army Medics have told me that most head wounds in Vietnam died. I would have been lucky to live another forty-two minutes. It has turned into forty-two years and except for dead brain cells that affect my memory I'm still going strong. Every day since then has been something extra. Even "bad days" could be worse. 

Jim Dickson

 

I just remembered Dick Pearson, SEAL Team One, Det Golf was on the fore ward starboard .50 cal the night of the ambush.   He visited me at a Mobile Riverine Force Reunion in San Diego in 2001 and filled some blank spots in my memory.    I really appreciated that. 

I just remembered Admiral Ward sent my father a letter after I was wounded (copy enclosed).   I've got to tell you that letter cut through a lot of red tape with the VA.

                               

             

         

                   

 

              

 

From: Jim Dickson
To: Doc Riojas 

Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2008 11:29 AM 
Subject: 7 OCT 66 - This Date in Vietnam History 


Hi Doc Riojas, 

I thought you might be interested in an email that Franklin Anderson sent out last year on 7 OCT 66. (see below) 

: This Date in Vietnam History----This was a sad day, even though we never had any KIA, We suffered some permanent injuries that forced two men to retire--LTJG Bill. Pachacek, and PO Bob Henry.  

CPO Herb Ruth was on one of the machine guns and the barrell was so hot you could see the rounds going through it. When it was all over the barrells were drooping. We lost our first casualty on 19 August 66 (Billy Machen), and from that day forward SEAL DET GOLF took vengence on the VC.

Capt Weyers (Then a LT) was instrumental in the initial success of SEAL'S actions in the RSSZ, that paved the way for their continued success, even today.

 One of the Boat Crew Jim Dickson suffered head wounds and also was retired. A GALLANT Group of men that to this day can not go through the Airport Security without setting off the alarms.

 HOOYAH - Franklin    ( I was CO of SEAL Team ONE at this time) 

Billy Machen was the point man on a patrol. As he was going through an open area he noticed the VC were lying in ambush. They were waiting for him to pass through so they could hit the main group. He instantly opened fire thus sacrificing his own life to save his team. 

As the Commander Wandres' yeoman I typed up a recommendation for the Navy Cross. The recommendation resulted in the posthumous award of a Silver Star. I was so impressed by Billy Machen's selfless act and dedication to his team that I put in a special request chit to crew on their Mike boat. 

Jim Dickson

 

From: Franklin Anderson
To Sent: Friday, October 10, 2008 7:18 AM
Subject: Fw: 7 OCT 66 - This Date in Vietnam History 



This is the sequel to the previous message that Jim Dickson sent---It is interesting to note that the SEALS on the Mighty Moe accounted for approximately 58 KIA and untold wounded and broke the VC attempt to invade Nha Be.

 The follow on is that We lost Bill Pachacek and Bob Henry in the near past dying prematurely from the wounds received. "Herb Ruth was later commissioned and went into law enforcement in Utah. He passed away quite some time ago of a Heart Attack---

This group of Valiant men are fading rapidly-- CWO Moscone passed away, and it was "suspected" that Agent Orange was the culprit.

Franklin Anderson

 



This email was cleaned by email Stripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

                                      TAP’s 

                      
       "Boats" Bill Fischer with Ball Cap MRFA & 9th Reunion Drawbridge Inn

BMC William L. “Boats” Fischer U.S. Navy Ret. Passed away in his sleep September 4, 2008. Boats had been in declining health for a few years. Boats Fischer was a great person you would not have found a nicer shipmate and friend. He enjoyed being a MRFA member and the camaraderie that he shared with all the Army and Navy members he met . He could take a joke and give back as good as he received he will be missed by all hands Army and Navy a like. 

Boats served as a Boat Captain on PBR-97 River Section 532 7/66-7/67 out of My Tho. Boats will have his ashes buried at sea by the U S Navy.. 

You may contact the family @ Margaret Fischer 87-165 St Johns Rd. Waianae, HI. 96792-3258 (808)-   668-7494. May our brother rest in peace and find peace 

Albert Moore 

                          A Sailors Prayer 

"The Lord is my pilot, I shall not go adrift; He lighteth my passage across dark channels; He steereth me through the deep waters, He keepeth my log. He guideth me by the evening star for my safety's sake. Yea, though I sail mid the thunders and tempest of life, I shall fear no peril for Thou art with me. The vastness of thy sea upholds me. Surely fair winds and safe harbors shall be found all the days of my life; And I shall moor, fast, and secure, forever Amen. 




   EN3 Perry Underwood, PBRs Vietnam K.I.A.

Vietnam War's River Rat Community Honor One of Its Own

                click to elarge

By Ed Friedrich Friday, October 17, 2008 
BREMERTON, WASH.

Perry Underwood has a 10-story building named after him, but few know his story. The Vietnam War casualty's river-rat brothers acted Friday to keep it alive.

Members of Gamewardens Northwest rededicated a Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton hotel in the former Bainbridge Island sailor's honor, and they unveiled a display about Underwood and the Brown Water Navy with which he fought.

Underwood, of Rolling Bay, enlisted in the Navy the day after New Year's in 1966. The Bobby Darin look-alike was 19 years old. Three-and-a-half years later, he was an engineman third class aboard a river patrol boat on the upper Saigon River. While escorting a convoy, Underwood's boat came under an intense rocket and automatic weapons attack, according to his bronze star citation. He returned fire until his boat took a direct rocket hit.

Underwood and two crew members died that day, June 23, 1969. The remaining two were badly injured.

Patrolling Vietnam's inland waters was among the most dangerous jobs in the war. Those sailors earned their combat pay, and more, said first gentleman Mike Gregoire, who came up from Olympia to cut the ribbon and cake. The event brought back memories for Gregoire, who as a young lieutenant ran convoys up the Mekong River.

"When I see a guy like (Underwood), I immediately see the men in my unit," he said.

The Northwest chapter of the Gamewardens, led by president Heinz Hickethier of Belfair, put the display together. Five members of the group, who are veterans of the Vietnam River Patrol Force, attended Friday's event.

River patrol boats were used in the Vietnam War from 1966 until 1972. They were the most common craft in the River Patrol Force, Task Force 116, numbering as many as 250 boats. Their mission was to stop and search river traffic in an attempt to disrupt weapons shipments. That effort often got them in firefights with enemy soldiers on boats or on the shore.

The Mark II patrol boats were 32 feet long and 11 feet, 7 inches wide. The fiberglass hulls had water-jet drives that allowed them to operate in shallow, weed-choked rivers and canals. They only drew 2 feet of water fully loaded, could spin 180 degrees in the length of a boat and stop from full speed — 28.5 knots — in a couple lengths.

They typically carried twin .50-caliber machine guns up front, a 7.62-mm machine gun, a grenade launcher and sometimes a 20-mm cannon.

The Naval Base Kitsap building originally took Underwood's name when it opened as a bachelor's enlisted quarters on Memorial Day 1978. Structures drew names then from local sailors killed in battle. Underwood's photo and medals were pinched between two automatic glass doors that would open and shut on those trying to view them. When the building recently was renovated into a Navy hotel, Hickethier found more space to add a model river patrol boat, patches, photos, maps and other memorabilia.

 Submitted by:    Jim Dickson ;  jdickson [at] aceweb.com;  Sunday, October 19, 2008 ;  Subject: River Rat Community Honors One of Its Own

                          

 

              

  PBR Reunion 2008

                                                   018.gif (479471 bytes)    

010.jpg (88592 bytes)    0010.jpg (118096 bytes)  019.jpg (141879 bytes)    

  018.jpg (160380 bytes)    016.jpg (85023 bytes)

markolsonmikegregoireheinzhickethier.jpg (77403 bytes)  underwood01.jpg (105801 bytes)  pbrsailor.jpg (70354 bytes)  mkIIpbrrestored.jpg (55663 bytes)  

   015.jpg (141790 bytes)                           forwardguntub.jpg (46438 bytes)

                      Photos contributed by "Pancho" OCanas

 

   
Steve Gardner and Zero Ponsdorf

                                                            

                                                                                          

                                                         

                                                                                  

 

 

Most of these Boat Photos from Bob Stoner

 

 


 

From: Bob Mhoon <bobmhoon[at]tx.rr.com>

to: docrio45[@]gmail.co,; archives [at]frii.com

date: Wed, Dec 31, 2008 at 7:47 PM

subject: Seal Pics - 1965

mailed: -bytx.rr.com

Resent directly with photos JIC.

Happy New Year,

Bob Mhoon

Steve, I stumbled onto the Seal site pretty much by accident.

I took the attached photos while a crew member aboard the USS Spinax (SS-489) about July or August 1965. We were doing Seal insertion/extraction training on San Clemente Island (off San Diego ) in prep for deployment to the Gulf of Tonkin . Thought perhaps you might get them to a website where other team members might be able to identify the individuals.

The trusty group at the 50 Cal was our newly minted gun crew. In one, the CO was taking his turn. We carried three 50’s and had two bridge mounts and two aft on the cigarette deck where that pic was taken. As I remember there were a couple of hundred boxes of ammo stored in what used to be the after torpedo room.  I believe we were one of the last submarines that could announce, “Man battle stations surface.”

The .57 MM was a demonstration of why you didn’t want to stand behind it.

I remember a couple of things about this operation. One was being on sonar and helping vector in the returning team who had a pinger on the collapsible rubber boat. Most important was taking care of the team’s nourishment. Those guys ate a month’s supply of our steak and lobster in just one week!

Hope you have a great 2009

Bob Mhoon          ETCS(SS) Ret (1981)            Arlington , TX

 

From: wshark79 [at] aol.com
To: docrio45 [at] warpspeed1.net
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2009
Subject: seal team 1&2 "nam" photo"s with mst-2 boat drivers 


DOC, 

I BET YOU HAVE NOT SEEN THESE PHOTO"S,YOU ASKED ME A WHILE BACK IF I HAD SOME PICS,WELL HERE THEY ARE!!,I JUST LEARNED HOW TO USE SCANNER. MYSELF BILL MOREO, AND RICK SHEPARD BROUGHT THE FIRST LSSC"S INTO NAM LATE 1968,HERE IS THE FIRST INSERTION OF SEAL TEAM 2 AT CAN-THO,RVN.BY LSSC.SORRY I CAN"T REMEMBER NAMES MAYBE YOU KNOW SOME OF THEM 

#1 -1ST SEAL TEAM 2 INSERTION AT CAN-THO/BEN-THUY EN-1 MOREO DRIVING,EN-2 RICK SHEPARD GUNNER (BACK VIEW.) 

#2- SAME AS ABOVE( FRONT VIEW) 

#3- CAN-THO LCPL WITH SEAL TEAM-2 PLATOON EMBARKED. NOTE 7.62 MINI-GUN ON THE BOW 

#4- SEAL TEAM 2 RADIOMAN CALLING FOR EXTRACTION, I WAS ON MY WAY IN. 

ALL THESE PHOTOS ARE LATE 68-EARLY 69, I HAVE A FEW MORE FROM CAN-THO,ME-THO AND NHA-BE I DROVE BOATS FOR SEAL TEAM-1&2 DURING THE 1967-69 TIME FRAME FROM THESE BASES. 

BEST REGARDS BILL MOREO ENCM (SW) USN.RET

This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Big AL" Ashton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HELP!    I cannot find the email that these photos came with !   WHO SENT THEM?  Help please !

                                     

                                

 

 

                  
                                           Herb Ruth and  ? ? 

                                              
                                       Herb Ruth                                 click on image to enlarge

  

 


Please  scroll to the bottom of this table and read the bottom email first in order to get the jest of their conversations.     I did not alter their composition.       The Webmaster:  docrio45 [at] gmail.com

From: Kiet Nguyen
To:   bill_laurie [at] yahoo.com ; Guy Arrans ; bayacresfarm1 [at] peoplepc.com ; 'Charles Benninghoff (Charles Benninghoff)' ; Charles Benninghoff ; Sam Bishop ; Larry Bissonnette ; 'William W. Cater' ; WW Cater ; Cooper, Clarence ; dpajax@hotmail.com ; Fanton, Red Walt ; Ferguson, Kirk ; Glen Fry ; Dick Godbehere ; Keeffe, Dennis ; Martin, Cecil ; McPHERSON, HARLAN ; Albert Ocanas ; President@tf116.org ; Doc Riojas ; Dennis Scully ; SLAY, GLEN ; Herb Stephan ; Watson, Steve ; Weatherall, Larry ; Westling, Chaplain Lester ; Mike Wiley ; Bill Wood ; YUSI, FRANK ** ; Ken Delfino ; Ralph Christopher
Cc: Hai Tran
Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009 12:21 PM
Subject: Re: 31 years....  (webmaster)Kiet states Ralph CHristopher's statements are not all TRUE ! 


Gentlemen, 

I must respond and making clear to Ralph Christopher's email because his statement was wrong so far from the fact as I was a part of that BAT-21's rescue operation.

  Even it was over 36 years from April 1972. I have never forgot that operation with US Navy SEALs Lt. Thomas R. Norris and we were at the last part to bring home Lt. Col. Hambleton. The first part it was entire Sea Commandos team did work with Tommy and Lt. Col. Anderson for recoveried 1st Lt. Mark Clark pilot. 

Then our team had suffered by the NVA's shelling as Lt. Col. Anderson and my Vietnamese Commando's chief team were wounded. You remember I was assigned to the Sea Commandos unit at that time. Indeed I was graduated (May 1970) from the LDNN in Cam Ranh Bay under US. Navy SEAL and Vietnamese SEAL trainers . So, I was only one who came from LDNN and the rest of my team those whom were belong to the Sea Commandos unit. 

You said: Kiet was accompanied by several other LDNNs who backed out of the mission refusing to go out to the river to meet Hambleton and Kiet said he was pissed and had to go alone to the river so Hambleton would come out of the jungle, which he did once he saw Kiet. 

Then joined Norris who was in the trees undercover. No, It is not truth. Ralph, you have a little bit imagine on this story while I was in Bellingham with you and some other men who came from Brown River Patrol vets for that event.

  I would remind you and the camera man (I can't remember his name) about you guys were promised me that after the interview you will send me the copy of that part. But two of you never make it.

  If you have that tape recorded by the camera man you should know what I am saying. Bring it up Ralph to tell the truth of your story (Not mine.) 

Gentlemen, I appreciate all of you for recalling this history document of the Vietnam's war.

  Again, I must Thanks all of you for been there and done that to stop the waves of communism in South East Asia.

  God bless you all. 

Kiet Nguyen LDNN 


--- On Fri, 1/30/09, Ralph Christopher <rwchristopher@cox.net> wrote:

 

 


 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ralph Christopher" <rwchristopher [at] cox.net>
To: <bill_laurie [at] yahoo.com>; "Guy Arrans" <shark17 [at] sbcglobal.net>; 
Cc: "Hai Tran" <hai.tran18 [at] gmail.com>; "Kiet Nguyen" <ktnguyen95 [at] yahoo.com>
Sent: Saturday, January 31, 2009
Subject: Re: 31 years.... 



I had the honor of interviewing Nguyen Van Kiet a couple of years ago in Bellingham and David Lowrence of the museum filmed it and the DVD is at BUMM. If I remember correctly, Kiet was accompanied by several other LDNNs who backed out of the mission refusing to go out to the river to meet Hambleton and Kiet said he was pissed and had to go alone to the river so Hambleton would come out of the jungle, which he did once he saw Kiet. Then joined Norris who was in the trees undercover. Unlike the film they were air lifted out. There were no friendly patrol boats in Laos, which is where I believe they were. Kiet said Norris called him later and informed him he had put him in for the CMH but they gave him the Navy Cross, believe the only South Vietnamese to be awarded one. He lives in Seattle and had just gotten married and brought his wife. We spoke for over a hour with his broken English and my bad Vietnamese.

 


 ----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Laurie" <bill_laurie [at] yahoo.com>
To: "Guy Arrans" <shark17 [at] sbcglobal.net>; 
Cc: "Hai Tran" <hai.tran18 [at] gmail.com>; "Kiet Nguyen" <ktnguyen95 [at] yahoo.com>
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2009
  Subject: Re: 31 years...



Ken, well-written piece. No way anyone with any brains or integrity can -or want to- 'let it go.' No damn way. Nice you mentioned Nguyen Van Kiet, whose role in rescue of LTC Hambleton never got coverage it should have. Here's a couple of other Viet Namese who should be well known...and would be in a sane, mature, intelligent society, which appears to be lacking: 

Nguyen Quy An: 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nguyen_Quy_An 

http://www.jsonline.com/news/obituaries/29447804.html 
Tran Van Bay: 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tran_Van_Bay 

 

 




Bill 

 On Fri, 1/30/09, Ken Delfino <philippepinuts@colfaxnet.com> wrote: 

From: Ken Delfino <philippepinuts [at] colfaxnet.com>
Subject: 31 years....
To: "Guy Arrans" <shark17 [at] sbcglobal.net>
Cc: "Hai Tran" <hai.tran18 [at] gmail.com>, "Kiet Nguyen" <ktnguyen95 [at] yahoo.com>
Date: Friday, January 30, 2009,
Brothers of the Brown Water Navy:
 


0430 UTC: 

At this exact moment 31 years ago, the PBRs of River Divisions 531, 532 and 533 had been scrambled not only after the monthly mortar visits from the Viet Cong, but also after hearing accompanying small arms automatic fire within the city limits! Similar occurrences were taking place against our Navy brothers in Can Tho, Long Xuyen, Chau Doc, Binh Thuy, Nha Be, Sa Dec, Hue and Vinh Long, which was overrun. 

With our Mobile Riverine Force to the west, 7th ARVN Division to the north, 32nd VN Ranger Bn to the east, the VNN and our SEAL teams were doing what they needed to do to ensure that none of the 3 battalions of Viet Cong got close enough to damage or overrun our headquarters. As it was, in My Tho there were VC bodies at the "Y"...about five blocks from the Khach-San Victory HDQ and Carter Billet.

 Everyone has their memories of that particular morning...whether that morning is more impressive than any of the others during our tours of duty is up to each individual. We all had fires to put out, casualties to transport, attacks to counter and when night came, we hoped that we had enough adrenaline left to stay awake through the night. 

That was not problem though with Spooky, Seawolves and Gunslingers showering the ground with red tracers where green tracers rose to find them. Everyone cat-napped, but no one really slept. Actions of that week...and many other actions is what has kept our bond of camaraderie strong over the years. Someone once said that "the bond of friendship forged in combat is second only to the bond between a mother and child". 

Over the years I have met many of our fellow veterans who wore Navy blue, Army green, Air Force blue, Coast Guard white and the Globe and Anchor who also wear that Yellow-Green-Red ribbon that ties us all together. Over the years I have met younger warriors, enlisted and officers, who do not wear that ribbon, but who have told me that "we did the job necessary in the long run...stemming the tide of communism from spreading beyond the shores of Southeast Asia" which helped lead to the eventual fall of the Soviet Union.

 I am very proud to read of the success of those South Vietnamese, Laotian and Cambodian allies who were able to escape and make it here...and become citizens and successful business owners contributing to our society. I am even more proud of their children who understand what it was like to live under the fear that accompanies war and have joined our military and proudly serve today. 

I do want to point out that during the rescue of  LCOL Iceal Hambleton, portrayed by Gene Hackman in Bat 21, one key person's role in that rescue was not emphasized enough in my opinion. I salute Petty Officer Kiet Nguyen, LDNN (SEAL), South Vietnamese Navy for his heroic actions with LT Tom Norris in that rescue operation. Because he is Vietnamese, he was not awarded the Medal of Honor as LT Norris was, but he was awarded our Navy Cross.

 This evening at dinner I'll raise my glass in a toast to my brothers-in-arms and to the 58, 260 Killed In Action and the 1,740 who are still Missing In Action. I've been told I should "let it go" by people who do not understand...but no way in hell will that happen...not until my last breath...or until all of our men are accounted for...whichever comes first. God Bless America for we are...One Nation Under God! 

Ken Delfino, United States Navy (ret)
River Division 533, 
TF-116 (PBRs) 


10/66-7/68 


This email was cleaned by emailStripper, available for free from http://www.papercut.biz/emailStripper.htm


ETN3 Mike Prather receives his commendation from the Chief of Naval Operations on the arrival of PTF-17 and PTF-19 at Great  Lakes, IL.  The presenting officer is RADM Draper L. Kauffman, Commandant of the Ninth Naval District.  RADM Kauffman was the father of Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) and the Underwater Demolition Teams that became today’s SEALs.

LINKS

        Smallest Photo Ablum of  Ole SEALs

                    WAR BOATS.org 

http://www.specwarnet.com/americas/sbu.htm  what happened to this LINK?    Help, somebody  

Other VN War Boats HERE  !  

http://www.warboats.org/

       vietnam.htm#stoner

 

 

                                                                                                 Just Say No

Mi Vida Loca - Copyright ©1998 - All Right Reserved       Webmaster:  Erasmo "Doc" Riojas        email:   docrio45@gmail.com     

Folks are asking Doc Riojas "how to find a picture" on www.sealtwo.org 
HERE IS NOW !

SEAL TWO Photo ALbums by Doc Rio

Hooyah!  A shouted term used often in SEAL Training that means:

  • Hell Yeah!
  • Fuck off
  • Fuck you
  • OH SHIT, not again!
  • Yes Instructor
  • Not again
  • A-firm
  • This is REALLY going to suck
  • This is REALLY going to fucking hurt

Read more: http://sofrep.com/2459/shit-navy-seals-say/

    Mi Vida Loca - Copyright ©1998 - All Right Reserved        email:   el_ticitl @yahoo.com

 

                             

 

 

    SEARCH  Engine ONLY for SEALTWO.ORG

 

 

 

Morning Folks,
Doc Riojas, if you want to publish it on your website, here’s a humorous trailer for you of my next book. IF not, enjoy the read.... Later, Carl 

Howdy men, I hope everybody is impatiently awaiting the arrival of the third installment in The Indomitable Patriot series. The book takes us back to 1943 and the submarine USS Great White (SS-299), commanded by LCDR Marcus Spencer. You will recall the Great White and Captain Spencer from the first book, FERTIG, along with Evelyn “Pinky” Pinkert and LCDR (detailed OSS) David Meyers from both FERTIG and book two, DEAN. The Great White is at Mare Island for overhaul and installation of some OSS communications gear. After attending meetings at OSS headquarters, Spencer, Meyers and Pinky drive the the OSS training academy, the former Congressional County Club. All right, here’s a short, humorous trailer from book three.... 

The meeting continued for a couple more hours before breaking. Meyers, Captain Spencer and Pinky drove to the Country Club to spend the night with Pinky in the guesthouse. The following morning they would fly to Fort Monmouth in Pinky’s Staggerwing Beechcraft. 

~~~ ~~~

“It never fails to amaze me, whenever I come down here,” Meyers said as they parked in front of the administration building. “I’ll never forget the first two weeks of the academy when Pinky shared a bunk in a dormitory with twenty-three other men.” 

“That’s all right, Mister Meyers,” Pinky said, ice in her voice. “We can save that story for another time!” 

“Now my interest is peaked,” Spencer replied. 

“Later, sir,” Pinky replied as she deeply blushed. “Only after a martini will I be able to tell that story.” 

“My humble command,” Pinky said when Meyers and Spencer stopped and stared at the barbed-wire encased Quonset huts. “Come inside administration for a moment and I will introduce you to Colonel Godfrey, our administrator. Not even the Colonel has clearance to enter the barbed wire. After meeting the Colonel, David and I will give you a tour of the facility.” 

As they drove around the complex, David and Pinky explained the training program for OSS Special Agents. They were parked at one of the five-hundred yard ranges when Spencer asked, “You went through all this firearms training, Pinky?” 

“Captain Spencer,” Meyers answered, “Pinky is a distinguished master with a rifle. She can outshoot me.” 

Spencer glanced at Pinky. “My COB, or Chief Of the Boat on the Great White is a thin, wiry fellow. Almost soft-spoken, but get under his skin or fail to obey a command, he instantly becomes a grizzly bear. I suspect, ma’am, the two of you are not that different.” 

Pinky started up and then abruptly stopped their Jeep. “You see that man out there, Captain, the one leading that squad. He will be going to Tinian with you. His name is Carlos Hathcock, Senior. He can outshoot all of our firearms instructors. He can hit bull’s eyes at a thousand yards with an iron-sighted rifle.” 

Spencer slowly shook his head as Pinky started up again. “Such young men we produce, to go in harm’s way,” he muttered under his breath. 

~~~ ~~~
Captain Spencer, David and I ate in the cadet’s mess. The food service was very good for cafeteria-style service. Afterward, we adjourned to the recreation room where I fixed martinis for the three of us. David brought up the subject of the academy again… to my great embarrassment. 

“You delight in forcing me to tell that story, don’t you, Mister Meyers,” Pinky said as she broke out in laughter. 

“Marcus (Spencer had told them to dispense with the Captain Spencer routine), my family owns this place, the former Congressional Country Club. I lived in the guesthouse when they leased it to the OSS for the duration of the war, under the condition I continue residing in the guesthouse. My uncles didn’t want me moving back to Chicago where I would be too close to them. The OSS hired me, and I applied for special agent training. David and I were in the first academy class.” 

“For the first two weeks of physical, as well as stress training, everybody lived in open barracks. If you survived that period, you moved into individual rooms for the remainder of the training. Their theory, the enemy would neither discriminate nor go easy on a female, so they lumped everybody together.” 

“Sunday afternoon, the day before the training officially began; I’m arranging my uniforms and gear in my locker… in an open bay with twenty-three other guys.” 

Marcus began to chuckle and then laugh aloud. “Excuse me, Pinky, I’m picturing you bunking in the crew quarters on a sub and being with eighty men who have not bathed in a week or two. It gets pretty foul at times on a boat!” 

“We are all tending to our gear while our drill instructor marches up and down the aisle, screaming ‘The enemy intends to kill you, pretty women as quickly as big, tough men,’ and all that.” 

“And then Gunny stops at my bunk. I come to attention. The rim of his Smokey Bear hat a fraction of an inch from my forehead. ‘Pinkert, you get one privilege,’ he screams… spittle landing all over my face. ‘There is one stall in the head with a curtain. That stall is yours alone. In exchange for that privilege, you shall not use the men’s urinal. Do you understand that?’” 

“Sir, yes sir,” I screamed in Gunny’s face, biting my tongue to keep from laughing. Then Gunny screams, “Men, you will report immediately if you catch Pinkert using your urinal. Do you understand that?” 

“A chorus of ‘Sir, yes sir,’ rang throughout the barracks. By now I’m about to explode with laughter.” 

“It got worse when Gunny yelled at us about one shower for everybody,” David interrupted. “I’ll save Pinky further embarrassment and leave that to your imagination.” 

“Pinky, water is in such short supply on a sub that bathing usually amounts to a gallon of water, once a week if you’re lucky,” Marcus replied. “There is an officer’s head on board, but it’s usually crammed full of supplies for most of a patrol. Everybody uses one head in the after torpedo room. That, too, becomes pretty foul after weeks at sea.” 


Carl McLelland

 


THE INDOMITABLE PATRIOT  Fertig, The Guerrilla General

One of our guys, although he had the misfortune of going Army instead of Navy, has become a writer in
his old age. His first few books were about the paranormal... he likes to chase ghosts in his spare time. But his latest
endeavor; Wow! He has started a new series of books he calls Behind the Lines. His first book, recently completed and
published is titled “THE INDOMITABLE PATRIOT: Fertig, the Guerrilla General.” It’s a historically correct novel about Wendell Fertig in the Philippines in World War II.  Here’s what the book looks like. 
Cover Final :
May, 1942. General Wainwright has just surrendered the Philippines. Wendell Fertig, a Corps of Engineers Lieutenant Colonel, refuses to comply and flees into the mountains of Mindanao. Fertig is soon
joined by dozens of former Philippino Army scouts who encourage him to form a guerrilla Army. Over the next few months Fertig is joined by several other displaced American soldiers, one of whom builds a small, makeshift transmitter and establishes contact with the Navy. 
General MacArthur denounces Fertig, going on record claiming it’s impossible for a guerrilla movement in the Philippines to succeed. The O.S.S. decide to take a chance and covertly supplies Fertig by submarine. Once he receives the tools to wage war, his achievements become legendary. By the time MacArthur returns to the Philippines in 1944 he is met on the beach at Leyte by a force of over twenty thousand of Fertig’s guerrilla Army. 

This fictional accounting is based upon the actual military records and reports of one man’s impossible achievements against overwhelming odds; against an enemy who outnumbered him a hundred to one. Wendell Fertig, a civil engineer and untrained amateur in the ways of war, defied the predictions of the experts and brought the Japanese Army to its knees. Enjoy this first installment in the new Behind The Lines series of combat thrillers based upon historical records.


The book is available from Amazon in either print or Kindle versions, or by special order from almost any book retailer.
(He’s not Tom Clancy yet. They don’t stock his books but they can order them). These links will take you to the Amazon listings. If you look at the Kindle listing there is a Look Inside feature that lets you read through the first chapter. 
Print: 
http://www.amazon.com/Indomitable-Patriot-Fertig-Guerrilla-General/dp/
1512025623/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1431972445&sr=8-1&keywords=the+indomitable+patriot 


Kindle: 
http://www.amazon.com/Indomitable-
Patriot-Fertig-Guerrilla-General-ebook/dp/B00XUSX4RU/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1432050603&sr=
1-1&keywords=the+indomitable+patriot
 

About the Author     Carl’s professional career began as an Army and then FAA air traffic controller. He advanced from a small radar van in the Central Highlands of Vietnam to the TRACON in one of our nation’s busiest airports. He also became a commercial pilot and flight instructor, retiring after thirty-nine years of flying. By 1986 he was experiencing severe burnout. He put himself through the police academy, resigned from the FAA and became a deputy Sheriff in Reno, Nevada. He retired after a distinguished career on the street. Not only the cop on the beat, Carl became a renowned traffic accident reconstructionist on his departments Major Accident Investigation Team, as well as a highly acclaimed crime scene investigator. Throughout his life Carl has been a student of the paranormal and often experienced the effects of the supernatural in his personal life. In 2012 he became involved in the saga of the haunted Allen House in Monticello, Arkansas and its resident spirit, Ladell Allen Bonner. The result of dozens upon dozens of paranormal interactions with Ladell led Carl to write his first book about Ladell’s life and death. Writing that first book sparked a latent avocation in his life: writing. Carl has always been a connoisseur of military history, and that interest began a new direction for his writing. This latest book is the story of Wendell Fertig, and the beginning of a thrilling new series, 'Behind The Lines.' While the stories are fictionalized, they are all based upon factual military history. Join in with Carl and enjoy his books as you gain an interesting new insight in what war is all about.

The following is typical of the reviews I’m receiving on the book: 


Just finished your book and you get 4.0 marks from this old Navy Seal. Really enjoyed and it adds to my hobby of WWII.
Spent 22 years of my 34 in and out of the PI. Have traveled every island and was trained a marksman by RJ when we were
stationed at Team 2 during Vietnam. Still a very good friend I keep in contact with. Going to recommend it to my friends,
at least the ones that can read.

 THE INDOMITABLE PATRIOT  Fertig, The Guerrilla General

Doc Riojas Comment:  Once i started reading this book, i have find myself hard to putting it down! because of my very old age (84 yr old eyes and at the end of being able to correct my vision) I find that the way  the paragraphs are other important text are spaced to be extremly easy to read.

Having retired from the Navy and traveled to that part of the orient reminds me of my days as a guerrilla combatant as part of the Navy SPecial Warfare serving as a Navy SEAL in the Jungles of Vietnam.

The author is equally as good a military writter as Tom Clancy.  This story may possibly be material for a great movie similar to the the movie produced about the POW rescue in WWII by Filipino Guerilla fighters and the U.S. Army Rangers.  "The Great Raid"

Do not wait to buy it tomorrow, order it today !  It was recommended to me by CDR R.D. Thomas (recommended for the Medal of Honor by the US Army, but our politically correct US Navy downgraded it to a Navy Cross. SHame on them !

Carl McLelland, USMC Pilot: the author’s father